Mary Monk-Tutor and Terry Tutor. Drug Store Soda Fountains of the Southeast

By Higby, Gregory J. | American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education, February 2010 | Go to article overview

Mary Monk-Tutor and Terry Tutor. Drug Store Soda Fountains of the Southeast


Higby, Gregory J., American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education


Mary Monk-Tutor and Terry Tutor. Drug Store Soda Fountains of the Southeast. Circleville, Ohio: Health Care Logistics; 2008. 120 pp, $48 (paperback), ISBN 9780615233376.

"This is a wonderful book about a unique part of Americana," states Mickey Smith in the foreword to Drug Store Soda Fountains of the Southeast. And Smith is spot on about this labor of love written by Mary Monk-Tutor and Terry Tutor, who drove a motor home across the region to visit 70 drugstores in 2005.

Drug Store Soda Fountains is a beautifully produced soft-cover book full of color photographs that convey well the spirit of this American institution. The relaxed and fun nature of the book is captured by page 6, which features an array of different soda fountain stools.

More than 50 drugstores from Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and the Carolinas are covered in detail. For most of these pharmacies, the authors include a short store history timeline; a narrative paragraph, and one to 3 interior photographs. For about a dozen, recipes are included for desserts (eg, "Vanilla Chess Squares"); drinks ("Hobo Float"); ice cream ("Preacher's Special"); salads ("Miss Sheila's Potato Salad"); sandwiches ("Miss Bobbie's Sliced Egg Sandwich"); and soup ("Thomas Drugs Homemade Chili"). Thirty-four recipes are revealed, including several that have been "secret."

For a review in an academic journal, it would be easy to dismiss a book like Drug Store Soda Fountains as nostalgic and irrelevant. That would be foolish. …

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