Exploring Chile's Wine History, Regions

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 7, 2012 | Go to article overview

Exploring Chile's Wine History, Regions


Imagine an expanse of vineyards that glistens in Pacific mist, then ribbons through tiny valleys and across a vast plain to climb into stark mountain peaks. Where in the world are you?

If you thought California, you'd be right. But this column is about Chile.

Chile's winegrowing topography mirrors California's, only longer, higher and upside-down. California's coastline stretches for 840 miles; Chile's is nearly 3,000. California boasts the highest vineyards at 2,000 feet; Chilean vineyards rise to 3,000 feet. And while California's wine regions reach north to cool Mendocino County (39-degrees latitude), Chile's vineyards reach south to Malleco Valley (38-degrees) toward the frigid Antarctic.

Chile and California also share roots of winegrowing history. In the 16th century, Spanish missionaries carried the Word and the vine north to San Francisco and south to Chile's lush Central Valley. By the 19th century, both wine regions had won international acclaim.

Destinies veered sharply, however, in the mid-1900s. As California's wine industry boomed along with American prosperity, Chile's became mired in economic instability and social unrest.

In the late 1980s, Chile transitioned toward a free-market economy. Stability attracted investment from international wineries looking for the last affordable, prime vineyard land on earth. Between 1987 and 1993, more than 25,000 acres were planted with premium varieties including Cabernet, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. New regions pioneered Syrah and Pinot Noir.

With vineyards thriving and wineries pumping out well-made and affordable wine, Chile now focuses attention on the international marketplace. To help customers understand their unique regional flavors (i.e. terroir), [URL]Wines of Chile;http://www.winesofchile.org[/URL], a group of wineries committed to promoting the country's wines, has organized 24 winegrowing valleys into three major regions:

Costa: Chilled by the Humboldt Current, Chile's coastline was considered too cold for winegrowing until the 1980s, when viticulturalists experimented with cold climate varieties like Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and the brisk, grassy Sauvignon Blanc that is now Chile's white wine calling card. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Exploring Chile's Wine History, Regions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.