Back Pain Sufferers Depression Candidates

Sunshine Coast Sunday (Maroochydore, Australia), November 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

Back Pain Sufferers Depression Candidates


PEOPLE living with back problems are 2.5 times more likely to experience a depressive disorder than the wider population, according to a report released by the Federal Government's Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

One in 11 Australians Co or 1.8 million people Co had back problems in 2007-08, which related to bones, joints, connective tissue, muscles and nerves.

Past studies estimate 86% of sufferers experienced pain one day a week and 14% lived with persistent pain.

According to the report, people with back problems are 1.8 times as likely to report an anxiety disorder than the wider population.

They were also 1.3 times more likely to report a substance use disorder and 2.5 times more likely to experience an affective disorder, such as depression, bipolar affective disorder and mood disorders.

C[pounds sterling]Back problems are a common reason for pain among younger and middle-aged adults, but they can start early in life, between ages eight and 10,C[yen] the report says.

Estimates indicate 70% to 90% of people suffer from lower-back pain at some point in their lives.

Orthopaedic surgeon and rheumatologist Associate Professor Markhus Melloh from the Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, said pain and mental health problems had a cause and effect relationship. …

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Back Pain Sufferers Depression Candidates
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