A Very Special Issue: Critically Reflecting on Australia's National Career Development Strategy

By McIlveen, Peter | Australian Journal of Career Development, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

A Very Special Issue: Critically Reflecting on Australia's National Career Development Strategy


McIlveen, Peter, Australian Journal of Career Development


The Commonwealth Government's Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relation's (2012) National Career Development Strategy Green Paper is a major milestone in the evolution of the career development industry in Australia. Just as the previous Coalition Government should be acknowledged for the impetus it gave to formulate and implement the Professional Standards for Australian Career Development Practitioners under the aegis of the Career Industry Council of Australia (2009), the current government should be acknowledged for taking the next step in the industry's development by publishing the Green Paper and supporting its development with four major consultation reports. Indeed, in different ways, the Australian career development industry has enjoyed the support of both sides of government. This is a fact to be celebrated, as not all nations in the OECD receive such support from their respective governments.

The exigencies of budgets and Cabinet priorities will no doubt influence how the department proceeds. To be sure, what will transpire in response to the Green Paper is unknown at this stage but there is a constant in all of this hurly-burly and it is we who constitute the field of career development: counsellors, teachers, guidance officers, researchers, employment officers, human resource consultants, coaches, psychologists and many more. How we read the Green Paper is a topic worthy of consideration. Accordingly, I invite you to take a moment to reflect upon your perspective and the implications of the Green Paper.

The Green Paper's media release is interesting and provides a useful stimulus for consideration. The Minister for School Education, and for Early Childhood and Youth, the Honourable Mr Peter Garrett (2012) 'said the nation's future prosperity relies on matching the skills and career aspirations of Australians with the needs of businesses' and that the Green Paper 'outlines how a National Career Development Strategy will help in the provision of quality and equitable access to career support for all Australians'. The wording of these two extracts is quite significant.

The first extract may be interpreted as a call to traditional career development theories and practices that emphasise person--environment correspondence, those that operationalise matching interests, skills, abilities and values to occupations and work environments. Recent research demonstrates that the RIASEC model of vocational interests, often criticised for its reductionist vision of career, may form the conceptual and empirical basis of a holistic psychology of individuals (Armstrong, Day, McVay & Rounds, 2008). Furthermore, if educational outcomes are to feature in the National Career Development Strategy--recall the Commonwealth Government's aim to achieve bachelor qualifications among 40% of Australian 25-34 year olds by 2025--then the strategy's authors would do well to consider the evidence that congruence between interests and studies or work or both is a useful predictor of academic performance and work performance (Nye, Su, Rounds & Drasgow, 2012; Tracey & Robbins, 2006). Indeed, after 100 years, the traditional matching model has much to claim in terms of its capacity to contribute to the formulation of a strategy that matches skills and aspirations of individuals with the needs of industry.

From another perspective, read through the eyes of a critical perspective (Stead & Bakker, 2010; cf. special issue of Journal of Career Development, Stead & Perry, 2012), the words 'the needs of business' and notions such as 'skills shortages' can take on a different meaning (McIlveen, 2007). A critical perspective demands analysis beyond mere words and their denotative meanings towards an analysis of their connotative meanings in discourse (Stead & Bakker, 2010). Consider what is implied in the Minister's words 'the nation's prosperity'. In broad terms, it could refer to the general good, the utilitarian happiness of the majority. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Very Special Issue: Critically Reflecting on Australia's National Career Development Strategy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.