1910 Building Law for D.C. Is Height of Absurdity Today

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

1910 Building Law for D.C. Is Height of Absurdity Today


Byline: Deborah Simmons, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Rep. Darrell E. Issa, California Republican, who chairs the House panel overseeing D.C. affairs, is really onto something that D.C. Mayor Vincent C. Gray, Council Chairman Phil Mendelson and council member Kenyan McDuffie should give considerable attention to.

Mr. Issa wants the National Capital Planning Commission to study changing the Height of Buildings Act of 1910, an outdated federal law that prohibits skyscrapers like those highly recognizable in Boston, New York and Philadelphia, as well as Minneapolis, San Francisco and Seattle, from gracing the District's skyline.

Mr. Issa has not proposed dwarfing the federal core of the nation's capital with tall buildings or allowing them to overshadow historic institutions like the U.S. Capitol and other congressional buildings, the White House and Supreme Court.

Skyscrapers also shouldn't overwhelm the nation's monumental museums and memorial keepsakes along the National Mall.

But options for the capital should not be restricted to neighborhoods and busy corridors with mere rooftop eateries and watering holes.

Federal planners should use common sense to ease height restrictions that have stunted economic growth in the city and define a course that encourages D.C. stakeholders to look skyward.

The original Height of Buildings Act of 1899 and the congressionally amended version of 1910 spell out height limitations wrapped around the breadth of sidewalks, and whether a street is primarily commercial or residential, among other stipulations. Height limitations are even spelled out for such streets as Columbia Road in Northwest, a densely populated area with day and nighttime populations hardly imaginable to federal lawmakers at the beginning of the 20th century.

The general rule of thumb followed for a century is that no building can be taller than 130 feet, or about 10 stories.

The Issa proposal opens the door to vertical growth within the city's 68.3-square-mile boundary.

Congress has a clear and appropriate interest in preserving both historic characteristics of our nation's capital and ensuring that long-standing rules and regulations still pass the test of common sense, said Mr. …

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