What's Your Career Plan for 2013? Starting Postgraduate Study in the New Year Is a Great Way to Boost Your Earning Capacity and London Metropolitan University Has More Than 120 Different Courses Starting in January, Writes Niki Chesworth

The Evening Standard (London, England), November 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

What's Your Career Plan for 2013? Starting Postgraduate Study in the New Year Is a Great Way to Boost Your Earning Capacity and London Metropolitan University Has More Than 120 Different Courses Starting in January, Writes Niki Chesworth


Byline: Niki Chesworth

MANY of us are beginning to question how we can get ahead in the New Year and what we can do to differentiate ourselves in a tough jobs market. In a workforce teeming with ambitious graduates, the answer is a postgraduate degree.

Professor Peter McCaffery, deputy vice-chancellor of London Metropolitan University, says there are many reasons graduates sign up to London Met for further qualifications each January.

"We are all familiar with the idea of a fresh start in the New Year, this often focuses on money and our working lives," says Prof McCaffery.

"The graduate needs of the economy are growing and will continue to do so. But once graduates get to their second or third job they often realise they need to better equip themselves for the future. We also see people who simply want to fulfil a personal interest -- we cater for both these categories."

a year can make a difference "The typical postgraduate student is someone in their thirties looking for another string to their bow," says Prof McCaffery. "They are looking for a recognised qualification, offering a good blend of theory and practice that will make them more credible as a professional whether in business, education, healthcare or finance.

"Most study part-time, usually for two evenings a week or a half-day and an evening. We recognise that students are usually working, so we tailor the programmes to meet their needs.

"It is hard work but at the end of just one calendar year they will have transformed their professional prospects." London Met offers a January start date, recognising that those who have already embarked on a career are less focused on the cycle of the academic year, which traditionally begins in September, and more concerned with how to fit study around work.

With postgraduate programmes in a wide range of subjects, London Met says the average student spends roughly six hours a week in the classroom (this varies depending on the programme). They then put in around three hours of independent learning for every hour at the university.

learning around work With many students earning while they learn, a major factor in selecting is location. This is where London Met's position at the centre of the capital is a great convenience. …

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