Engaging Men and Boys in Conversations about Gender Violence: Voice Male Magazine Using Vernacular Rhetoric as Social Resistance

By Phillips, Joshua Daniel | The Journal of Men's Studies, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Engaging Men and Boys in Conversations about Gender Violence: Voice Male Magazine Using Vernacular Rhetoric as Social Resistance


Phillips, Joshua Daniel, The Journal of Men's Studies


Voice Male magazine is an on-going, in-print publication that touts itself as "male positive, pro-feminist, and open-minded." Being distributed four-times a year, this small publication is steeped with articles, book reviews, and editorials about gender violence and masculinity. The topics included within this text are inclusive across various factions of sexual violence, sexuality, pornography, and fatherhood. In addition, the National Advisory Board for this publication reads like a Gender Communication 101 syllabus and draws on the work of several well-known activist and scholars such as Eve Ensler, Robert Jensen, Jackson Katz, Michael Kimmel, and Sut Jhally. However, while the richness of academic and activist experience is appreciated among its contributors, Voice Male magazine is not exclusive in its published expressions and actively encourages outside voices to submit for publication.

As a publication that specifically addresses men and men's roles is ending gender violence, Voice Male magazine offers a unique perspective as vernacular rhetoric to end gender violence; a movement that has traditional focused solely on women's roles. Within the confines of the academy, a rhetorical analysis of this publication would help develop new ways of comprehending men's roles in ending men's violence against women, children, and other men. With a focus on men's roles in a traditionally female movement, Voice Male articulates the various struggles and tensions of men working through a patriarchal system that privileges their gendered identity. While traditional socialization may push men into prejudicial ways of thinking and acting, spaces such as Voice Male aim to counteract these exclusionary systems of oppression and opt to open up new spaces that provide men with a model for working against gender oppression from within a privileged body.

The purpose of this paper is to discover the ways Voice Male magazine uses vernacular rhetoric as social resistance and challenges dominant discourses. Furthermore, this essay will look at the rhetorically strategies used by Voice Male in discussing issues of gender violence and masculinity within the confines of a publicly available text. By analyzing the topics and themes represented across several issues of the magazine, I hope to unveil some of the strategies implemented by Voice Male in an effort to determine how Voice Male creates a space for more inclusive dialogue about gender violence and masculinity.

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

One way culture has begun addressing the larger systemic issues of sexism and gender violence is by highlighting conversations where men are actively engaged in educating other men through mainstream forms of mass communication. With these thoughts in mind, the purpose of this review of literature is to place Voice Male magazine within a larger, contemporary cultural context. By understanding the current cultural climate and literature that addresses men's violence against women, children, and other men we can better understand how Voice Male might function as a written text within a larger conversation about gender violence.

Gender Violence Statistics

In speaking about the prevalence of men's violence against women, the United Nations estimates that one-third of the three billion women on our planet will be abused, beaten, and/or raped in her lifetime (Tjaden & Thoennes, 2000). Men's violence against women is ubiquitous and can manifest as child abuse, child sexual abuse, stalking, sexual harassment, sexual intrusion, rape, murder and/or domestic violence. Drawing from The World Bank to highlight the pervasive nature of domestic violence specifically, Alhabib, Nur, and Jones (2010) assert "Worldwide, domestic violence is as serious a cause of death and incapacity among women aged 15-49 years as cancer, and a greater cause of ill health than traffic accidents and malaria combined" (p. 370).

Turning to statistics of sexual assaults, in 1987 Koss, Gidycz, and Wisniewski released a landmark study indicating that one in four college women was the survivor of a completed act of sexual assault. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Engaging Men and Boys in Conversations about Gender Violence: Voice Male Magazine Using Vernacular Rhetoric as Social Resistance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.