Gauging Your Interest

By Borman, Laurie D. | American Libraries, November-December 2012 | Go to article overview

Gauging Your Interest


Borman, Laurie D., American Libraries


A few weeks ago, American Libraries sent you a survey. And despite all the other surveys and polls and requests that likely came to you this election season, more than 4,000 of you responded. Thank you for taking time to provide feedback.

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We want to know what you think about the magazine, and indeed, all the media streams of American Libraries--AL Direct, American LibrariesMagazine.org, Twitter (@AmLibraries), Pinterest, and Facebook. We'll be looking at all the data and plan to make improvements to the look and content of the magazine as well as our online site. We've signed up with a new design team at ALA, headed by Kirstin Krutsch and Chris Keech, to develop this new look with your input, with a planned launch in 2013. In the interim, watch for subtle changes to features, added infographics, and sidebars. We hope you'll like what you see.

Starting this month, we're also launching American Libraries Live, a streaming video broadcast that you can view for free (at American LibrariesLive.org) in your library, at home, or while sipping coffee at your favorite Wi-Fi-enabled cafe. The first program--on Friday, November 16, at 1 p.m. Central time--features ALA TechSource author Jason Griffey talking about libraries in the near future in "Library 2017: Tech at Warp Speed." Topics for other shows include strategies for landing your ideal library job, digging into databases, and the real deal about ebooks for libraries, and will be hosted by Marshall Breeding, Warren Graham, and other experts. …

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