Domestic Violence in Mexico: Perspectives of Mexican Counselors

By Orozco, Arturo Enrique; Nievar, M. Angela et al. | Journal of Comparative Family Studies, September-October 2012 | Go to article overview

Domestic Violence in Mexico: Perspectives of Mexican Counselors


Orozco, Arturo Enrique, Nievar, M. Angela, Middlemiss, Wendy, Journal of Comparative Family Studies


INTRODUCTION

In spite of many efforts and programs carried out by organizations, governments, researchers, and civilians, domestic violence continues to affect millions (1). According to the World Health Organization, between 10% and 52% of women living in different countries around the world have experienced physical violence perpetrated by an intimate partner and between 10% and 30% of women have suffered sexual violence. In addition, the proportion of women physically assaulted by a partner at some point in their lives shows similar rates. The magnitude of this situation varies from 10% of women in Paraguay and in Philippines, 11% in Netherlands, and 13% in South Africa and Puerto Rico to 28% in Nicaragua, 34% in Egypt, and 47% of women in Bangladesh (Krug, Dahlberg, Mercy, Zwi, & Lozano, 2002). In Mexico, the prevalence of physical violence has been estimated at about 9% (Instituto Nacional de las Mujeres [INMUJERES], 2003).

Similar to the presence of domestic violence in other countries, domestic violence remains a serious problem in Mexico. In general terms, between 10% and 73% of Mexican women reported experiencing an episode of domestic violence in their lives (Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica [[NSP], 2003). According to National Institute of Women, 38.4% of Mexican women have experienced psychological violence and 7.8% of Mexican women have experienced sexual violence (JNMUJERES, 2003). On average, five men kill their intimate partner each day in Mexico (INSP, 2003). The most recent data provided by the National Institute of Statistics and Geography showed that 8.7 million women experienced at least one episode of domestic violence during the last year, 6.9 million women experienced psychological violence, 5 million women experienced economic violence, 2.2 million women experience physical violence, and 1.3 million women have experienced sexual abuse (Institut[degrees] Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia [INEGI], 2003).

Researchers and those working with families continue in efforts to better understand the antecedents of domestic violence as a means of identifying approaches to reduce its presence (2). Although there are a considerable number of studies exploring the phenomenon of domestic violence in Mexico (Acharya & Salas, 2005; Agoff, Rajsbaum, & Herrera, 2006; Olaiz, Rojas, Valdez, Franco, & Palma, 2006; Ortega, Mudgal, Flores, Rivera, Diaz, 8.r. Salmeron, 2007; Ramirez-Rodriguez, 2006; Rivera, Allen, Chavez, & Avila, 2006; Saucedo-Gonzalez, 1995), a review of the scientific literature showed a lack of research on practitioners' perception of domestic violence in the Mexican context. Few have addressed the context of intimate partner violence (Ramirez-Rodriguez, 2002; Salama, 2008). Research that does examine possible antecedents of violence, or contexts in which violence is most likely to occur, have addressed the question from the perspective of the victim. Understanding antecedents of domestic violence and environmental contexts in the counseling setting may support practitioners and their clients who are involved in violent relationships.

Given this current state of the research literature and given that victims of violence may not be accurate reporters of their experience due to the trauma and distress associated with the event (Herman, 1992; Mannar, Weiss, Metzler, & Delucchi, 1996), practitioners' reports provide important information. Of course, counselors may also be biased by their personal experiences or social class perspective (Morrow, 2005); nevertheless, we assert that they offer unique insights to the problem of domestic violence in Mexican culture. To help in further identifying antecedents and the context of domestic violence among Mexican women, the present study examines domestic violence and its antecedents from the perceptions of the counselor. Thus, this study contributes significantly to the knowledge of domestic violence in Mexico from an unexplored perspective. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Domestic Violence in Mexico: Perspectives of Mexican Counselors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.