Frontline Staff Make Case for How the Health Service Can Improve Care and Patient Safety; in the Past Few Weeks, Health Boards Have Published Proposals to Change the Way Healthcare Is Provided in Hospitals across South Wales. Although Still under Consultation, Many People Will Be Questioning What These Proposed Changes May Mean for Their Healthcare. Those Behind the Plans Looked at the Main Issues That May Be of Concern to Patients in the Region

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), October 8, 2012 | Go to article overview

Frontline Staff Make Case for How the Health Service Can Improve Care and Patient Safety; in the Past Few Weeks, Health Boards Have Published Proposals to Change the Way Healthcare Is Provided in Hospitals across South Wales. Although Still under Consultation, Many People Will Be Questioning What These Proposed Changes May Mean for Their Healthcare. Those Behind the Plans Looked at the Main Issues That May Be of Concern to Patients in the Region


Q What's the difference between engagement and consultation? Will services change at the end of this engagement period? A During this engagement period, health boards across South Wales will talk to as many people as possible about the challenges the NHS is facing and the ideas and suggestions put forward by frontline clinicians about how the health service can improve quality of care, patient safety and outcomes within available resources.

Engagement is designed to allow the public to have their say about the issues facing the NHS. Health boards will consider all the comments made during this engagement period (which lasts for 12 weeks until December 19) before moving to consultation in the New Year on the various options for change.

Q Why do hospital services need to change? AThe way hospitals are used has changed. More life-saving treatment can be provided in the community closer to home; but hospital services are also relied on more, especially in an emergency.

One in three pregnant women now need obstetric help during childbirth and meanwhile the number of people using A&E has been rising by a steady 2% every year.

Health boards say evidence increasingly suggests that because of the way services are currently organised and staffed, patients are not getting the best standard of healthcare possible and, as a result, the outcomes of such care are not as good as they should be. The aim must be to offer patients round-the-clock access to care from the most experienced staff possible and provide stable, safe and sustainable hospital services with the limited number of doctors we currently have.

Q There are lots of doctors - so what's the problem? Why can't we just employ more and more staff? A South Wales, like other parts of the UK, is experiencing difficulties recruiting sufficient doctors, at both consultant and training level. Some specialities, like A&E and paediatrics, have been particularly hard hit by these national shortages.

There has been a large increase in the number of students entering medical schools in the UK but this increase has not translated to a growth in the number of doctors opting to work and train in certain specialities, including A&E and paediatrics across the UK. In addition to this, Wales has traditionally not been regarded as an attractive place for doctors to come and work and continue their training.

Because of these problems recruiting doctors, health boards have been forced to rely on expensive locums to maintain services. Relying on locums to provide specialist hospital services is not affordable in the long term and does not offer patients the best possible care.

Q When will all this change happen? AA consultation on firm options for hospital service redesign could be held next spring.

Any changes to hospital services will not happen overnight but services will have to begin to change in the near future to respond to the urgent problems the NHS is facing. In some cases, health boards may also need to invest in new buildings, facilities and equipment before change can take place.

Q Is this just another way of getting rid of older hospitals? A The plans are not about brick and mortar but about the services provided inside the walls of their hospitals and about ensuring that those patients who need it have access to 24/7 consultant-led care so they get the best possible care and have the best clinical outcomes.

Q Is this just the beginning of even more changes to the NHS? A The NHS has been through a lot of change since devolution but this has mainly been structural - health authorities were abolished to make way for local health boards and, in 2009, local health boards and NHS trusts were integrated to form the present health board system.

The ideas for change developed by the South Wales Programme are about where and how patient care is provided to ensure patients receive the best quality and most appropriate care for their health needs when they need it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Frontline Staff Make Case for How the Health Service Can Improve Care and Patient Safety; in the Past Few Weeks, Health Boards Have Published Proposals to Change the Way Healthcare Is Provided in Hospitals across South Wales. Although Still under Consultation, Many People Will Be Questioning What These Proposed Changes May Mean for Their Healthcare. Those Behind the Plans Looked at the Main Issues That May Be of Concern to Patients in the Region
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.