Physical Fitness Brings Balance to Your Life

By Murphy, Jean | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), November 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Physical Fitness Brings Balance to Your Life


Murphy, Jean, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jean Murphy Daily Herald Correspondent

Remaining physically fit has long been known as the key to living well.

The more fit you are, the more endurance you have and the more you can accomplish in a day. Taking a walk through the woods will not exhaust you. Trekking through the mall will be fun, not a chore. Climbing to your seats at a sporting or cultural event will not seem like scaling Mount Everest.

But in order to enjoy these perks of life, you need to maintain your level of physical fitness, so the physical dimension of wellness, like other dimensions, cannot be ignored especially by seniors.

Ruth Reyna is the fitness manager at Wyndemere in Wheaton, charged with helping residents stay fit, active and vital. A fitness specialist from the National Institute of Fitness and Sports, Reyna works at Wyndemere on behalf of the NIFS.

"I am at Wyndemere to provide residents with one-on-one fitness prescriptions based on their health histories and doctors evaluations. I design a fitness program for each individual, which can include fitness classes, workouts in the fitness center and special events," Reyna said.

Most are also tested on a "biodex" machine that evaluates a persons balance.

"The loss of balance is a big issue for seniors due to knee problems, inner ear problems or lack of leg strength," she said. "If we determine someone has a balance issue, we give them exercises to strengthen their legs because you have to be physically active to have good balance. …

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