Down Not Much Memory Lane; OLDEST WORKING BRIT COMPUTER IS BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE IN KENT SHED

The Mirror (London, England), October 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

Down Not Much Memory Lane; OLDEST WORKING BRIT COMPUTER IS BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE IN KENT SHED


Byline: EUAN STRETCH euan.stretch@mirror.co.uk

ONE of the world's oldest computers has sparked back into life after being re-booted by two scientists in a garden shed.

And although it looks like the nerve centre of a huge hi-tech network, these bulky machines actually make up just a single computer, an old ICT 1301 mainframe lovingly referred to as Flossie.

Rod Thomas and Roger Holmes have spent 10 years breathing life back into five-ton Flossie, which cost a PS250,000 in 1962.

And technology has whizzed by since then - you would need over four million Flossies just to match the same storage capacity of today's basic 8gb smartphone.

Despite its 25 square foot size, Flossie's 16,000 transistors and 4,000 logic boards only result in a puny 2kb memory and 1mhz processing speed - all of which can now fit on a couple of modernday 10mm silicon chips. Mr Thomas, 67, and Mr Holmes, 59, now face the painstaking task of using 27 reels of magnetic tape and 100,000 punch cards to recover software on the computer, which is currently housed in a shed in Kent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Down Not Much Memory Lane; OLDEST WORKING BRIT COMPUTER IS BROUGHT BACK TO LIFE IN KENT SHED
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.