Too Much Information! There Was a Time Women Would Gossip over the Garden Fence, but Now Social Networks Allow Us to Share Personal Information with Relative Strangers. Here We Look into How Much Is Too Much to Share on Facebook?

The People (London, England), October 28, 2012 | Go to article overview

Too Much Information! There Was a Time Women Would Gossip over the Garden Fence, but Now Social Networks Allow Us to Share Personal Information with Relative Strangers. Here We Look into How Much Is Too Much to Share on Facebook?


Byline: WORDS: JUDY COGAN

There was a time when you were seen as weird if you didn't have a TV. Now you get the same reaction if you haven't got a Facebook profile.

You can follow a person's life based on what they share on the social networking site. But how much is too much info to share?

Mum-of-three Jess Stone, 24, from Canterbury, Kent, gave her Facebook 'friends' a treat by keeping them updated during labour with her children, Elle-May, three, Reilly, two and Junior, one.

Her final post before popping each baby out into the world read: 'I need to push, be back soon.' Moments later photos of her newborns appeared on her Facebook wall. 'I updated my status every five minutes during labour,' Jess explains. 'Every twinge of pain and contraction went up for all of my 1,000 friends to read.

'With Elle-May I was in labour for 12 hours, that's a lot of updates!'

Her sisters Simone, 22, and Niaomi, 25 were updating their pages at the same time.

Jess signed up to the social networking site in September 2008 while pregnant with her first child.

She says: 'Being pregnant for the first time I was intrigued with other pregnant women; how they were feeling, what they were doing.

'There were a lot of pregnant women around me at that time so it was a good way for us to communicate regularly without actually meeting up.'

The self-confessed addict checks the site in the morning before getting her kids breakfast and every ten minutes throughout the day.

Jess adds: 'I posted photos and news of examinations and how many centimetres I was dialated. I even uploaded a photo of Junior 15 minutes after my first push. I held him first of course, putting his photo on Facebook before holding him would have been wrong. But I couldn't wait to show him off.'

Take it Easy Psychoterapist Marisa Peer says: 'It's incredibly sad that when someone is giving birth their attention and focus is on posting on Facebook. You can never get those moments back.'

And for some sharing too much information on Facebook isn't so rosy. Simon Gannon, 35 from London is still paying the price for oversharing. In June last year, he went on holiday to Egypt. Leading up to his holiday he told his Facebook friends how he couldn't wait for two weeks in the sun. During his trip, Simon updated his movements with holiday snaps.

He reveals: 'Unfortunately, midway through my trip I received a phone call from neighbours. …

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