Against


THERE is no doubt that a minority of people in Britain drink to harmful excess. But to punish the vast majority of responsible drinkers for the actions of a troublesome few seems to me to be not only unfair but downright perverse. Particularly, when the lack of evidence or precedent means we don't know if it would have any impact in the real world.

How can the Government justify imposing price rises when hard-pressed families are already feeling the pinch and millions of ordinary people are struggling to make ends meet? Its own research shows that a 50p minimum unit price would see 73pc of drinks in the offtrade rise in price overnight. It will hit the majority of responsible consumers in their pockets and it is high time they were given these facts.

Supporters of minimum pricing seem to be oblivious to the fact that the people who will be hit by it are pensioners enjoying the odd tipple, or working parents who buy a weekly [pounds sterling]4 bottle of wine to relax after a hard week.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies reported that even moderate consumers of beer and wine will have to spend up to [pounds sterling]71 a year extra under the Government's plans for the lowest expected minimum price of 40p per unit of alcohol and the health lobby wants at least 50p - rising with inflation. We know too that consumers are instinctively opposed to minimum unit pricing, with recent research from journal BMC Public Health showing that consumers dislike the policy on the grounds it will fail to tackle alcohol harm and punish moderate consumers of alcohol. As we hear of yet more splits within Cabinet, opposition across Europe, legal action in Scotland and growing opposition from consumers, I have to wonder if the Government is listening - or even bothering to try. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Against
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.