Paul Ryan: Serious as a Snakebite

By Hightower, Jim | The Progressive, November 2012 | Go to article overview

Paul Ryan: Serious as a Snakebite


Hightower, Jim, The Progressive


Most people would prefer a root canal to a budget discussion. I've heard that some dentists use a recording of House Budget testimony to numb their root-canal patients--everything from the neck up goes dead.

But Paul Ryan is different. The GOP's Vice Presidential nominee is said to love running his fingers through fiscal things. That's why the Washington cognoscenti have declared him to be "serious," rather than just another political opportunist riding the rightwing wave of Tea Party ridiculousness.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The widely ballyhooed Ryan budget is called "honest" and "responsible" by insiders who obviously haven't run the numbers on it. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center, however, has tallied it up. The analysts found that Ryan's plan, far from balancing the budget, actually increases the federal deficit by about $2.5 trillion!

So, yes, he is serious--serious as a snakebite.

Ryan's budget would provide another gold strike for the one-percenters, with millionaires-and-up averaging around $300,000 a year in tax breaks. The rest of us would get the shaft, including tax increases, privatization of Medicare, deep cuts in student aid and job training programs, and federal abandonment of food stamps and health care for the poor.

Yet, Ryan is on the Republican Presidential ticket specifically because his budget whackery has enthralled the GOP's far-right fringe. Anti-government guru Grover Norquist, for example, has gushed that Ryan would do for Mitt Romney's economic policy what Cheney did for George W. Bush's national security policy.

Wow, that's not a threat to be taken lightly!

During Romney's primary run, when he was trolling for votes in the shallows of the far-right swamp, he embraced Ryan's plutocratic plan, calling it a "bold and exciting effort" that is "very much needed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Paul Ryan: Serious as a Snakebite
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.