Business Etiquette in China

By Vollmer, Sabine | Journal of Accountancy, December 2012 | Go to article overview

Business Etiquette in China


Vollmer, Sabine, Journal of Accountancy


Faux pas and misunderstandings can easily doom a U.S. business deal in China. To improve chances of a successful venture in China, Len Jui, CPA, a partner at KPMG in Beijing who was educated in the United Kingdom and the United States and worked for the SEC, and Jiake Brownbill, a business culture consultant in the U.K., suggest U.S. executives acquire some essential soft skills:

* Be forthright about your intentions, resources, and goals. Successful business relationships in China are built on trust, loyalty, and honesty, which means Chinese take note of body language, keep track of what foreign investors say and do, and judge them based on their track records. Chinese business people will find out if a foreign investor failed to disclose important information or promised too much.

* Grasp the limitations imposed by a state-run economy. Learning about Chinese regulations, laws, and government policies helps U.S. companies put themselves into the position of their Chinese counterparts and understand the restrictions within the Chinese system. Chinese business partners may be bound by government targets and have little freedom to be creative. For example, structuring a deal so that the Chinese counterpart receives a government incentive is more likely to reduce the costs of the deal than bareknuckle negotiations are.

* Generate goodwill. Treat each encounter as a chance to reach a long-term goal, regardless of whether negotiations are successful. Showing respect toward others is highly esteemed etiquette in China. Diplomacy and tact are required to directly challenge figures of authority. Foreign investors that are looked upon favorably will be invited to bid for contracts.

* Hire a capable translator. Chinese don't expect foreigners to speak the language. But make sure the translator knows technical terms used in your business sector and can properly convey the meaning of figures of speech. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Business Etiquette in China
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.