Internet Postings Land Pair in Court; Brunswick Officer Wants Warrant over Facebook Comments

By Dickson, Terry | The Florida Times Union, October 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

Internet Postings Land Pair in Court; Brunswick Officer Wants Warrant over Facebook Comments


Dickson, Terry, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Terry Dickson

BRUNSWICK | Facebook comments are again in the Glynn County courts as a Brunswick police officer is seeking a warrant because of things a preacher said about her on the Internet.

Brunswick police officer Barbara Hartman asked Magistrate Wallace Harrell on Thursday to issue one warrant charging the Rev. Ken Adkins with making false statements or writings and concealing facts from or submitting false documents to the government. She also asked Harrell to issue a "good behavior" warrant to compel Adkins to stop saying bad things about her on Facebook.

Hartman told Harrell that Adkins "has caused me severe grief" in questioning her integrity as an officer and a business owner. On Facebook, Adkins accused her of using her police powers to access his criminal history and had named her and her sign company in relationship to an internal affairs investigation, she told Harrell.

There is a precedent in the court going back to late August when Steven Morgan, another magistrate, ordered Adkins to rein in his own Facebook political vitriol against Glynn County school board member Venus Holmes and Glynn County Commission candidate Robbie Tucker.

Adkins, who was managing the campaigns of Tucker's and Holmes' Republican opponents, had called Holmes a fool and a runaway slave, and he referred to Tucker as a child molester. Morgan said Adkins had no proof of what he was saying and ordered him to stop.

Darlynne Rogers, who was running against Holmes, and Tashawnta Wells, who was running against Tucker, immediately dropped out of their races and asserted that Morgan had unfairly muzzled their campaign manager.

Adkins said all he had done in Tucker's case was get his arrest records from the court, interpret it and put it on Facebook.

When it came to his own criminal record being posted on Facebook - Adkins spent time in prison in Florida - he cried foul. Adkins talks publicly about his criminal record but says he has turned his life around. …

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