Read These!


Eleven books you shouldn't miss.

The subtitle does not lie: Inside the a[umlaut]Secret World of Bombay's Dance Bars. Faleiro chronicles that world through the experience of 19-year-old exotic dancer Leela, who seems more like Faleiro's close friend than a reporting subject, and the Bombay club scene bears upon you as if it were your own neighborhood.

The story of Colt's relationship with his three brothers--the adored Harry, the emo Ned, the troubled Mark--is woven around entertaining anecdotes of famous siblings like Edwin and John Wilkes Booth and Theo and Vincent van Gogh. A perfect gimmick that makes this book even livelier than The Big House.

A book to keep at your side as you cook. Consider the fork. It's a piercing, sharp weapon associated with the Devil. How did this unlikely tool become the West's most popular and indispensable utensil? Wilson serves up brisk histories of everything you use in the kitchen.

The first book in 25 years by MacArthur-winning historian Limerick is an entertaining history of the Denver Water Board. (Stealing, even stealing water, is always good copy.) Best of all, this deftly wrought history banishes our complacency about where water originates.

In this coming-of-age novel about a tenacious teen boy with a nose for trouble, Petterson, author of the critically acclaimed sleeper hit Out Stealing Horses, tells his story in sentences so full of momentum that they insist on being read.

Most books about the Internet tell us how it's ruining our minds and social lives, but Blum does something far more interesting and ambitious: he sets out to figure out how it actually physically works. …

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