Doctors Diagnosed Woman with Anxiety and Sent Her Home - She Died from Rare Illness Weeks Later; VOLUNTEER WAS EXCITED ABOUT HELPING WITH OLYMPIC GAMES

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Doctors Diagnosed Woman with Anxiety and Sent Her Home - She Died from Rare Illness Weeks Later; VOLUNTEER WAS EXCITED ABOUT HELPING WITH OLYMPIC GAMES


Byline: IAN CAMERON newsdesk@walesonline.co.uk

AN Olympics games maker died of a rare illness after doctors sent her home from hospital saying she was suffering from "anxiety", an inquest heard.

Reem Salman, 34, an official volunteer for the 2012 Games, fell ill during a training day and died two weeks later without taking part in the Olympics.

An inquest in Cardiff heard Reem had been suffering from shortness of breath for 10 weeks before she died.

She was so worried that she twice went to hospital, but extensive tests could find nothing wrong with her.

On the second occasion she was discharged from the emergency unit at Northampton General Hospital by a doctor who told her she was suffering from anxiety.

But three weeks later Ms Salman, a volunteer for the men and women's football at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, was rushed to hospital by ambulance.

Ms Salman, who had been due to marry next year, was taken to hospital where she tweeted: "Gutted I won't be able to fulfil my Olympic volunteer dreams - still in hospital."

Her condition deteriorated and she died in Cardiff's University Hospital of Wales just three days before the Olympics kicked off.

Team GB soccer coach Stuart Pearce and top striker Craig Bellamy sent a sympathy card to her family.

The inquest heard a post-mortem examination revealed Ms Salman, who previously had received treatment for breast cancer, died from tiny tumours which had spread to her lungs and liver.

Dr Tristan Dyer, emergency consultant at the Northampton Hospital, told the inquest that a variety of tests were normal.

Dr Dyer said: "She had a past medical history of anxiety and a diagnosis of anxiety was made by a doctor and she was discharged. That diagnosis should not have been made - it is actively discouraged."

The inquest was told by one of the consultants who saw Ms Salman that the micro-tumours in her blood was a condition "I've never seen in my career". …

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