Embassy Row

By Morrison, James | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 10, 2012 | Go to article overview

Embassy Row


Morrison, James, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

mission accomplished

Peter Burian's pursuit of his lost luggage is almost a metaphor for his country, the Slovak Republic, and its quest for respect and relevance in Europe.

Mr. Burian, the new deputy foreign minister, arrived Friday in Washington after having traveled to diplomatic conferences in Dublin on Thursday and London two days earlier. He was due in New York after his Washington visit, where he addressed a major trans-Atlantic forum.

Somewhere between Ireland and the United States, an airline lost his luggage, and he arrived in Washington with only the suit he was wearing.

Mr. Burian told Embassy Row over breakfast at the Park Hyatt Hotel that he was bringing a message to Washington about the future of Europe from a country born almost as a diplomatic afterthought following the breakup of the Soviet Union.

For most of the 20th century, his country was the rump part of Czechoslovakia, which split peacefully into the Czech and Slovak republics in 1993.

The Slovak Republic struggled for the next decade to join the European Union. It entered NATO in 2004, after years of bitter disappointment over being blocked by Western complaints about human rights issues and a weak democracy.

Now the Slovak Republic is making an outsized contribution for a nation that's a little larger than Maryland and has about 5.4 million people.

The Slovak Republic is trying to fulfill the promise from the time we entered the [NATO] alliance, Mr. Burian said. We did not want to be a freeloader. We wanted to be part of the solution.

Slovakia has 343 troops in Afghanistan - a small contingent tasked with a dangerous duty: defusing unexploded bombs. Slovak troops also are helping guard the Kandahar air base and training Aghan soldiers.

Mr. Burian said the Slovak force will remain in Afghanistan after the United States and other Western nations leave in 2014.

The Slovak Republic also is turning its attention toward Tunisia, where it is actively promoting democratic development in the birthplace of the Arab Spring revolts.

We are trying to deliver democratic and civil society assistance, Mr. Burian said, referring to Slovakia's role in the Community of Democracies, an international pro-democracy group of more than 100 countries, founded in 2000. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Embassy Row
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.