Bardhan, Nilanjana and Weaver, C. Kay (Eds.). Public Relations in Global Cultural Contexts: Multi-Paradigmatic Perspectives

By Wood, Jennifer F. | Communication Research Trends, December 2012 | Go to article overview

Bardhan, Nilanjana and Weaver, C. Kay (Eds.). Public Relations in Global Cultural Contexts: Multi-Paradigmatic Perspectives


Wood, Jennifer F., Communication Research Trends


Bardhan, Nilanjana and Weaver, C. Kay (Eds.). Public Relations in Global Cultural Contexts: Multi-paradigmatic Perspectives. New York, NY: Routledge, 2011. Pp. 297. ISBN 978-0-415-87285-0 (cloth) $150.00; 978-0-415-87286-7 (paper). $39.95.

Public Relations in Global Cultural Contexts: Multi-paradigmatic Perspectives is a strong collection of essays by "public relations scholars geographically located across three continents, and with cultural roots and affiliations in more" (p. Ix). The collection of essays offers differing perspectives in the global public relations environment in order to bring alternatives to current thinking and research. The strongest review for this edited book may be found in well-articulated excerpts from each chapter that clearly expose the multi-paradigmatic perspectives.

The first chapter, titled "Introduction: Public Relations in Global Cultural Contexts," is where co-editors Bardhan and Weaver introduce each scholar's essay within the context of their aim to (a) "provide space for different theoretical and methodological perspectives to articulate how public relations is implicated in culture building in a globalizing world" and (b) "encourage public relations scholarship to move beyond the approach that equates country with culture, an approach that has so far dominated most theorizing of public relations in the context of globalization" (p. 22). The co-editors clearly articulate that while advocating the value of multi-paradigmatic perspectives in public relations, they do lean toward the critical paradigm in this book because they subscribe to the view that critical theory provides much needed insight into the role that public relations plays in shaping culture in the context of globalization (p. 15).

Chapter 2, "Critical Perspectives in Global Public Relations: Theorizing Power" by Lee Edwards, "couples Arjun Appadurai's theory of the work of the imagination with Pierre Bourdieu's theory of symbolic power to explore how public relations participates in the distribution of power in the context of globalization" (p. 17-18). Edwards argues that the chapter reminds us that

   to examine only normative practicalities of global
   public relations, or only the resistance of
   activist discourses, produces an incomplete representation
   of the effects of public relations in
   global contexts. Recognizing the power of public
   relations discourses to produce new imaginaries,
   or fields of the possible, in the context of cultural
   flows, reveals the multifaceted nature of the
   power exercised by global public relations practices,
   regardless of who initiates them. (p. 45)

In Chapter 3, "How Intercultural Communication Theory Informs Public Relations Practice in Global Settings," Michael Kent and Maureen Taylor argue that

   although most of us will never be able to gain
   expertise about every country and every culture,
   all of us can enact a dialogic orientation that will
   allow us to understand those cultures.... It is
   equally important to understand how diverse
   stakeholders and publics view the world, the
   range of such beliefs, and how our own beliefs
   and ethnocentrisms lead us to see the world in
   incomplete ways. The future of intercultural
   communication is not in knowing where a nation
   or culture falls on a social science dimension or
   scale. Rather, the future of intercultural competency
   is in the ability of practitioners to ask:
   What do different theories of intercultural communication
   provide that will help me to make
   sense of interactions and communication? How
   can I engage others relationally and dialogically?
   (p 71)

Kent and Taylor "conceptualize public relations as an organic process of evolving relationships, an approach that allows a move away from traditional, managerial approaches to international public relations and a move toward a co-creational understanding of public relations as third culture building" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Bardhan, Nilanjana and Weaver, C. Kay (Eds.). Public Relations in Global Cultural Contexts: Multi-Paradigmatic Perspectives
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.