Trans-Pacific Partnership: Secret Surrender of Sovereignty: Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations, Which Subordinate American Law to International Tribunals, Are Being Conducted in Secret-For U.S. Citizens and Politicians, Not Corporations

By Wolverton, Joe, II | The New American, November 19, 2012 | Go to article overview

Trans-Pacific Partnership: Secret Surrender of Sovereignty: Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations, Which Subordinate American Law to International Tribunals, Are Being Conducted in Secret-For U.S. Citizens and Politicians, Not Corporations


Wolverton, Joe, II, The New American


At an address to the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) on September 24, Mexican President Felipe Calderon praised his government's willingness to manipulate trade rules in order to increase Mexico's international posture, power, and influence. A big step toward that end was Mexico's entry into the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations.

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"A few months ago, Mexico joined the Trans-Pacific Partnership, TPP, negotiations. This will give Mexican trade the biggest boost since NAFTA came into effect," Calderon explained.

In June, President Barack Obama and U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Ron Kirk announced that both of America's NAFTA partners, Canada and Mexico, have been invited to join the secret negotiations aimed at establishing the TPP.

In an announcement published June 18 on the USTR website, Kirk wrote:

  We are delighted to invite Mexico, our neighbor and second
  largest export market, to join the TPP negotiations.
  Mexico's interest in the TPP reflects its recognition that
  the TPP presents the most promising pathway to boosting
  trade across the Asia Pacific and to encouraging regional
  trade integration. We look forward to continuing
  consultations with the Congress and domestic stakeholders
  as we move forward.

Kirk made a similar announcement a day later, publicizing Canada's invitation to join the super-secret TPP club, and Canadian officials were just as giddy as Calderon.

After undergoing the requisite review of its domestic trade policies, Canada eagerly joined the negotiations on the trade pact. With Canada, there are now 11 nations participating in the TPP negotiations: Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States, and Vietnam. This group of nations is working to establish "a comprehensive free trade agreement across the region." Of course, as was the case with the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), the trade conducted under these multinational agreements is never free of government control. Globalist bureaucrats who are unaccountable to and unelected by the American people would establish domestic trade policies in all member nations, including the United States.

In his statement formally welcoming Canada to the TPP negotiations, Kirk said:

  Inviting Canada to join the TPP negotiations presents a unique
  opportunity for the United States to build upon this already
  dynamic trading relationship. Through TPP, we are bringing the
  relationship with our largest trading partner into the 21st
  century. We look forward to continuing consultations with the
  Congress and domestic stakeholders regarding Canada's entry
  into the TPP as we move closer to a broad-based, high-standard
  trade agreement in the Asia-Pacific region.

In an address to the heads of state gathered at the 0-20 conference held in June in Los Cabos, Mexico, Calderon praised the TPP as "one of the free trade initiatives that's most ambitious in the world" and one that would "foster integration of the Asia Pacific region, one of the regions with the greatest dynamism in the world."

"Integration" is a word that is painful to the ears of constitutionalists and those unwilling to surrender U.S. sovereignty to a committee of globalists who are unelected by the American people and unaccountable to them.

All "partners" to the pact, including foreign corporations, would be exempted from abiding by American laws governing trade disputes. Moreover, the sovereignty of the United States and the Constitution's enumeration of powers would once again be sacrificed on the altar of global government by subordinating U.S. laws passed by duly elected representatives of the people to a code of regulations created by a team of trans-national bureaucrats.

If you're as fond of NAFTA and what it did for our economy and our sovereignty as Mexico and Canada are, then you'll love what the TPP has in store. …

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Trans-Pacific Partnership: Secret Surrender of Sovereignty: Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations, Which Subordinate American Law to International Tribunals, Are Being Conducted in Secret-For U.S. Citizens and Politicians, Not Corporations
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