"Sens-Ational" Art

By Osterer, Irv | Arts & Activities, January 2013 | Go to article overview

"Sens-Ational" Art


Osterer, Irv, Arts & Activities


After reaching the Stanley Cup final in 2007 and many successful seasons, 2011-12 was a rebuilding year for our NHL team, the Ottawa Senators. They asked for patience and continued support while management evaluated its younger, less experienced players.

Watching the Olympics' opening ceremonies and seeing how event planners were able to mobilize the crowd, it occurred to me that it might be possible to stage an interactive presentation at Scotia Bank Place with our students. It would be a way Merivale High School could do our part to help the team.

It was crucial for us to secure a seat configuration in the arena of four consecutive rows, with six seats in each. My idea was for students to each hold a segment of a large artwork that when held together on cue, would form the whole image. With this in mind, I contacted the Ottawa Senators office, where Kirk Manson and Jade Fair made the necessary arrangements.

Several senior graphic-design students agreed to take a leadership role with the project. We knew the features on these artworks had to be bold to be seen across an NHL arena. We decided to focus on the head and shoulders, and use the Senators' team colors, all in a strong horizontal orientation.

The students were keen to participate, as much of what they create in school does not reach a wide audience and is confined to in-house displays and art shows visited by family and friends. This was a unique opportunity to see how one's artwork would interact with the world in a very public way.

MATERIALS

* Nine-ply bristol board

* Acrylic paint and paintbrushes

* Transparency for projecting artwork

* Overhead projector

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

High-school students will ...

* recognize the elements of shape and color that contribute to creating a successful large work of art.

* participate in an art event involving their community.

* understand the importance of teamwork when creating and assembling a large-scale project.

THE DESIGNS Isaak Skinner chose to create a portrait of Ottawa's senior statesman and captain, Daniel Alfredsson ("Alfie"), a crowd favorite. Paisley Laurenzio offered to help with the design for all-star center and assistant captain, Jason Spezza. And, Margaret Hotte jumped at the chance to render her favorite player, Erik Karlsson.

With the initial cartoons completed, linear transparencies for overhead projection were created for each image. The Alfie, Erik and Spezza images were projected and carefully traced onto 24 pieces of heavy-gauge nine-ply Bristol board, which had been arranged on a wall. A team of students helped paint all of the images.

PERFORMANCE ART Although we knew the paintings would have an enormous impact, we had to have a dry run with people holding the artwork pieces to see if they would work in an arena set ting. The bleachers in our school gymnasium proved to be a perfect spot to field test our project.

On game night, our School's Dixieland Band warmed up the crowd by playing at the front entrance of the arena. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"Sens-Ational" Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.