Knasas, John F. X. Thomism and Tolerance

By Hurley, Thomas J. | The Review of Metaphysics, December 2012 | Go to article overview

Knasas, John F. X. Thomism and Tolerance


Hurley, Thomas J., The Review of Metaphysics


KNASAS, John F. X. Thomism and Tolerance. Scranton: University of Scranton Press, 2011. 168pp. Paper, $20.00--John Knasas holds that tolerance is an "undeniable aspect of the common good," and therefore support for tolerance is a standard all philosophies must meet. This tolerance should be "fraternal," based not on mutual indifference but on mutual concern for the other. Thomism and Tolerance seeks to defend the modern ideal of tolerance through grounding it in a metaphysical understanding of Thomistic ethics. Knasas therefore argues in chapter one that, contrary to widespread opinions, fundamental truth claims are not opposed to fraternal tolerance. Indeed, as Knasas argues at greater length in chapter five--particularly in criticizing the thought of John Rawls and Richard Rorty--political philosophies that rely on skepticism cannot provide an adequate foundation for tolerance.

Beginning in chapter two, Knasas therefore turns to the natural law ethics of Aquinas to find such a foundation. The approach to ethics here is profoundly metaphysical, which leads to an excellent discussion of Aquinas's first principle of practical reason, in which "the good" that ought to be done according to this principle points us to the notion of being. This first principle is therefore understood ultimately as a call to love so radical that "reality itself prompts us to love." Knasas examines here the richness, intelligibility, and analogous structure in the sameness-in-difference of being as the good.

The human person carries special dignity, as an intellector of being. "Among all the instances of being as the good, the human, through intellection, has the good in an especially intense manner." This grounds a universal psychology, for human beings always act in the context of at least some inchoate sense of ourselves as intellectors of being, even when we mistakenly act contrary to the truth of this dignity. There is an important discussion here of the implicit knowledge of metaphysics, and indeed orientation to God, given in ordinary experience. The relation of metaphysics to psychology is central to the entire work, and one finds scattered throughout the text some perceptive observations concerning this psychology of being in human life, for example in the depth of the experience of personal rejection: "Since being is so intensely present in our fellows, then their rejection of us can appear as being's rejection of us. And since being includes all, rejection can be experienced as total isolation."

In chapter four, Knasas moves from this grounding of ethics and psychology in being to a more specific argument for Thomism as the best foundation for tolerance in human society. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Knasas, John F. X. Thomism and Tolerance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.