"Times Square Show Revisited": The Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at Hunter College

By Pincus-Witten, Robert | Artforum International, December 2012 | Go to article overview

"Times Square Show Revisited": The Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at Hunter College


Pincus-Witten, Robert, Artforum International


Were we to have the beer-stained napkin upon which was scrawled the brainstorming list of the participants in, say, the Salon des Refuses or the first Impressionist exhibition (perhaps we do, but I've forgotten my Rewald), imagine how precious such scraps would be. It may yet seem a stretch to equate the Times Square Show of the spring and summer of 980 with these epochal undertakings--though posterity, such as it is a little more than thirty years on, appears to be taking a bullish view. But it seems to me that the ephemera generated by this sprawling Pictures-era conclave, from handbills to broadsides to stray snapshots and videos, are infused with the same talismanic quality.

To scrutinize the working floor plan by John Ahearn and Tom Otterness--with its list of some 150 (more or less) inclusions--is to set memory aflame, for scattered across the yellowing paper are names such as David Hammons, Keith Haring, Mike Bidlo, Kenny Scharf (then called "Jet"), Mimi Gross, James Nares, Walter Robinson, Fred Brathwaite (aka Fab 5 Freddy), Judy Rifka, Wolfgang Staehle, Alan W. Moore (who once interned as my assistant at Artforum), Rigoberto Torres, Mike Glier, and, obviously, dozens more. This reprise of the TSS at Hunter College also included video documentation of often-raw performance--footage of the installation, the fashion show, and a concert by Johnny Dyne11 and the Dynells--but real-time art interests me less than painting or sculpture, which, alas, are thinly represented. Particular standouts are a lost Jean-Michel Basquiat painting for the "Fashion Lounge," captured in a photograph, and Kiki Smith's large ex-voto-like painting Severed Limbs, 1979-80, an early masterpiece. Ahearn is the real sleeper. Underregarded cast portraits of his black and Hispanic neighbors in the Bronx suggest that he was our Franz Xaver Messerschmidt (Messerschmidt being the great eighteenth-century sculptor of hyper-realist "character heads").

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Despite the best efforts of Collaborative Projects (Colab), the organizing artist collective, the actual number of participants in the original show remains uncertain, mounted as it was in an abandoned firetrap of a building in the middle of the roiling tenderloin that was Times Square circa 1980. This shifting enumeration is inescapable, given the near-anarchy of artist-run exhibitions--and recalls the wavering participant count in the Ninth Street Show of 1951. Just as that exhibition signaled the emergence of the Abstract Expressionists, the TSS publicized the vitality of a galvanic body of artists then being brought, if not into the mainstream, at least into the historical record, a generation forged in the clubs, on rock music, on "alternative lifestyles," on a solidarity of disenfranchisement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"Times Square Show Revisited": The Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery at Hunter College
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.