H-PIS Luncheon Speaker Emphasizes Link between Health Care Reform and Criminal Justice

By Scafuri, Jenna | Corrections Today, October 2012 | Go to article overview

H-PIS Luncheon Speaker Emphasizes Link between Health Care Reform and Criminal Justice


Scafuri, Jenna, Corrections Today


0n Saturday morning at the conference, Pamela Hyde, administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA), spoke to attendees of the Healthcare Professional Interest Section Special Session and Luncheon. Hyde explained the connection between health care reform and the criminal justice system, and emphasized the role that the reform will play in things such as recidivism and reentry.

The luncheon took place one day after a tragic shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., only a few miles from Denver where the conference was held. Initial reports of the shooting alleged that the gunman suffered from mental illness, about which Hyde remarked, "This conversation that we're going to have today may be a little more challenging in the wake of the tragedy that happened in Aurora ... it reminds us of not only how connected we are as Americans, but also how all of you [corrections professionals] are connected in a profession that deals with some of the most challenging and complex layers of humanity."

"As you continue your important work at this conference, and as you go back to your own cities and communities, I want you to know that what you do every day is appreciated. Your work is appreciated," Hyde said. She indicated that half of people who are incarcerated suffer from mental health problems, 60 percent have substance use disorders and one-third have both. These alarming statistics present huge challenges, both to the criminal justice system and to the community. Hyde noted that there are more deaths related to mental illness and substance use disorders than there are by HIV, traffic accidents and breast cancer combined. "The country needs to embrace prevention for these issues, just like we have for HIV and breast cancer," Hyde said.

Hyde outlined how the changes in the health care system will affect this population in corrections. She explained that there are currently 37.9 million Americans who are uninsured, and of those, 11 percent have behavioral health problems and 18 percent are Medicaid expansion eligible. With the upcoming reform in 2014, many people who have never been treated for their conditions will now be able to seek help. This expansion in coverage also means that individuals in jails and prisons who generally do not have health insurance will now have more opportunity for coverage upon reentry, Hyde explained. She said that most will be eligible for Medicaid expansion upon reentry, and the change to a common Medicaid application that is based on income, not disability, will improve this process.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Since it has been proven that addressing behavioral health needs can reduce recidivism and expenditures in criminal justice systems while increasing public health and safety outcomes, SAMHSA is currently focusing on strengthening the bond between corrections and community health care. Hyde explained: "We are encouraging stronger connections between our behavioral health systems and our criminal justice systems, and are trying to engage our criminal justice partners in helping us identify and understand how behavioral health needs to be organized, paid for, funded and maintained as we move into this new health care environment." SAMHSA is doing this by working with partners in the community and corrections to develop standards and improve coordination around coverage expansions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

H-PIS Luncheon Speaker Emphasizes Link between Health Care Reform and Criminal Justice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.