Personality Counts in Job Search; Path.to Seeks to Match Technology Workers with Employment That 'Fits'

By Dixon, Drew | The Florida Times Union, November 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Personality Counts in Job Search; Path.to Seeks to Match Technology Workers with Employment That 'Fits'


Dixon, Drew, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Drew Dixon

Sure, experience counts in job hunting. But passion and personality now are among the key factors in the equation of a new, Jacksonville-based website that seeks to match employees with firms that specialize in the technology field.

Path.to is described as the "eHarmony" of employment websites by its founder Darren Bounds. But instead of matching up singles with their true loves, Path.to seeks to match technology workers with their true place of employment.

"We try to get a deeper understanding of the technology professional," Bounds said. "Then we pair that with a better understanding of a company, the industry that they're in, the culture of the particular business as well."

The key to personifying the match of tech employee with a tech workplace is a score affixed to all applicants running from 1 to 99. The higher the score, the higher the probability of a perfect match, at least in theory. The score is developed when workers sign up online with a version of a resume, references and social networking to Path.to. The companies provide similar information.

Path.to makes money from the companies when the workers are "introduced" to the potential employers, similar to a job-placement service. Bounds described it as a "digital recruiter."

Angela Mattia, Jacksonville University assistant professor of statistics and information technology, said Path.to has generated a buzz and it's definitely different than other employment websites.

"It's very different than anything that's ever been done. I give them a lot of credit for trying an innovative approach," Mattia said.

Cassie Irwin used Path.to to find a job as a project manager for a web development company in Boston, where she relocated to from Chicago.

"I liked the idea of it matching me up with a new job because I didn't really need a new job at the time," Irwin said. "It took me a while to get used to adding a skill set that you're good at. It was a new concept to apply for a job by picking the skill sets that were most important to me."

Normally, Irwin said, she was accustomed to guessing what the employer wanted out of her. Path.to changed the paradigm to putting her needs first.

The analytical evidence to determine what establishes passion or personality is following a trend used by many companies such as eHarmony for the past decade. …

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