Festive Period Reminds Us of the Commitment Shown by Our Nurses; Head of the Royal College of Nursing in Wales, Tina Donnelly, Highlights the Important Role of Nurses, Particularly during the Festive Season Monday, 31 December 2012 THEPROFESSIONALS

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), December 31, 2012 | Go to article overview

Festive Period Reminds Us of the Commitment Shown by Our Nurses; Head of the Royal College of Nursing in Wales, Tina Donnelly, Highlights the Important Role of Nurses, Particularly during the Festive Season Monday, 31 December 2012 THEPROFESSIONALS


Byline: Tina Donnelly

TODAY, on New Year's Eve, many people in Wales are looking forward to time off work, celebrating and enjoying the festive period.

There are, however, professions which do not get the break most of us look forward to at this time of year. Nursing is one of those professions, and nurses, the largest group of staff in the NHS and a crucial part of the healthcare team, will have been working 24 hours a day, many missing Christmas lunch or the opening of presents and other special moments, to ensure that patients who need care and support are looked after. Whether it is Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, Easter Sunday, or any other day of the year, nurses will be working tirelessly.

Throughout the year The Royal College of Nursing has been highlighting the challenges that nurses face but has also been celebrating the success of the nursing family. This Is Nursing, a public awareness initiative launched by the Royal College of Nursing in September, illustrates the complete picture of today's nursing. It acknowledges the challenges faced by the nursing profession but also celebrates the dedication of our nurses. The RCN in Wales launched the second phase of the Time To Care campaign.

This campaign emphasises that nursing staff need to be given time to perform their role to their highest caring ability. It emphasises the experience of care that patients and the public expect and the significance, diversity and essential nature of the nursing contribution to caring of nursing.

The UK-wide RCN campaign Frontline First campaign is still going strong, aiming to identify cuts that are harming patient care. It also seeks to pinpoint any waste in the NHS and celebrate the work of nurses and nursing teams who are coming up with credible solutions to budget restraint - improving patient care and experience while saving money.

In a time when large efficiencies are being made in the NHS, Frontline First empowers nursing staff to speak out against the cuts that impact on patient care, expose where they see waste and highlight innovations and new ideas. …

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Festive Period Reminds Us of the Commitment Shown by Our Nurses; Head of the Royal College of Nursing in Wales, Tina Donnelly, Highlights the Important Role of Nurses, Particularly during the Festive Season Monday, 31 December 2012 THEPROFESSIONALS
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