Only 4 Percent Support ObamaAAEs Tax Rates

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 31, 2012 | Go to article overview

Only 4 Percent Support ObamaAAEs Tax Rates


Byline: Alex Cortes, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

A recent example of polls being used against Republicans who oppose tax increases is the NBC-Wall Street Journal poll that found a strong majority, 59 percent to 36 percent, think Mr. Obama has an electoral mandate of eliminating the Bush tax cuts for those with higher incomes over $250,000 per year. Unfortunately, most of the public does not know what the top tax rate is today or what the top rate would be if the Bush tax cuts expired. Thus, there is no real measure of what the public supports with regard to the top tax rate.

How can there be a mandate to increase a presently unknown rate to a higher unknown rate?

There are two questions we should be asking, because the answers will tell us whether a real mandate exists and what its nature is. First, what perceptions about the top tax rates did Mr. Obama create among the public that won him a mandate to increase? Second, how do these perceptions square with reality?

If the perceptions he created square with reality, he has a mandate.

There were three examples Mr. Obama used almost exclusively throughout his campaign to paint the picture that the wealthy do not pay enough in taxes: Mitt Romney, Warren Buffett and himself.

Regarding the tax rates of Mr. Romney and Mr. Buffett, Mr. Obama sadly failed to provide full disclosure to the American people. He did not say the exact rate the two pay but merely portrayed it as lower than the rates paid by their secretaries and middle-class families across America. He was referencing the capital gains tax rate of 15 percent that most of the very rich pay on investments, which are their primary source of income. Mr. Obama and his allies even suggested that Mr. Romney may have even gotten away with paying zero taxes for several years, a charge that was never proved and that Mr. RomneyAAEs campaign disputed.

The Obama campaignAAEs portrayal of individuals like Mr. Romney and Mr. Buffett could not be further from the truth. In fact, their investment income is double-taxed, first when the corporation they invested in has to pay corporate taxes on their investments and then again at a 15 percent rate when profits are passed down to them as individuals via dividends or capital gains from the sale of stock. The double tax puts their effective tax rate far higher than the zero percent to 15 percent tax rate Mr. Obama obliquely portrayed them as paying. In reality, the highest marginal tax rate can reach 44.75 percent when corporate profits are taxed fully at the 35 percent rate.

This does not even take into account that the initial money they invested likely was earned as after-tax income earlier, making it triple-taxed. …

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