New Hostage Crisis in Iran; Mullahs Make Women Prisoners in Their Own Land

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 2, 2013 | Go to article overview

New Hostage Crisis in Iran; Mullahs Make Women Prisoners in Their Own Land


Byline: Nir Boms and Shayan Arya, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

At the end of her 49-day hunger strike, Iranian activist Nasrin Sotoudeh smuggled a letter from her Evin prison cell letting the world know about the 36 other female political prisoners incarcerated with her in Evin. This number is a new high. However, those women are not alone. Thirteen of them have immediate family members either in prison or under judicial pursuit. Ms. Sotoudeh, a human rights lawyer, was convicted in 2010 of spreading propaganda and conspiring to harm state security. Her crime was representing clients such as Iranian journalist Isa Saharkhiz and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi. While imprisoned, Ms. Sotoudeh began a hunger strike, which afforded a rare glimpse into the fate of female activists in Iran. However, this glimpse is not enough to convey the trauma of daily imprisonment of Iranian women in the land of ayatollahs.

Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the leader of Iran's Islamist Revolution, began his political activism in the early 1960s during the time of the late Shah of Iran's White Revolution. The White Revolution was a modernization process encompassing a number of reforms, including granting women the right to vote in 1963 (almost a decade before Switzerland).

Khomeini and the Islamic establishment vehemently opposed the voting reform on the basis that Shariah law does not allow women to vote. This was and has been a point of contention between the two camps ever since.

Under the late shah, Iranian women had equal rights to vote, get an education and work in the public sphere and the seemingly mundane right to choose how to dress. They also benefited from laws that protected them from abuses of their freedom. Women were not allowed to be married before the age of 18, they were permitted to divorce their husbands, and they could be granted custody of their children. Polygamy was banned, with very few exceptions, and in all cases, the permission and consent of the first wife had to be obtained.

Before the Revolution, Iran had nearly 100 female judges. Included among them was Shirin Ebadi, who later received the Nobel Peace Prize. There also was a Ministry of Women's Affairs dedicated to the empowerment of women and protecting their legal rights.

Immediately following the 1979 Revolution, the newly established theocracy moved to repeal the liberalized laws. The Ministry of Women's Affairs was abolished. Women were banned from becoming judges and discouraged from becoming lawyers. Judge Ebadi and her female colleagues were sent home.

The marriage age for girls was lowered to 9, in accordance with Shariah law. Only after years of protest from Iranian women's rights activists and international organizations was it raised to 13. …

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