The Latest Word from 1540: People, Places, and Portrayals of the Coronado Expedition

By Melzer, Richard | The Historian, Winter 2012 | Go to article overview

The Latest Word from 1540: People, Places, and Portrayals of the Coronado Expedition


Melzer, Richard, The Historian


The Latest Word from 1540: People, Places, and Portrayals of the Coronado Expedition. Edited, with an introduction, by Richard Flint and Shirley Cushing Flint. (Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 2011. Pp. xi, 505. $55.00.)

Francisco Vazquez de Coronado began his exploration of Tierra Nueva on New Spain's far northern frontier in 1540. Accompanied by more than a thousand Indian "allies" and African and Indian slaves, Coronado and his 375 Spanish followers searched for God (Catholic converts), glory (higher social status), and gold (although silver would do). Parts of the expedition traveled as far west as the Grand Canyon, as far east as the current state of Kansas, as far north in New Mexico as Taos Pueblo, and as far south as today's town of Truth or Consequences, an appropriate name for Coronado's entire entrada. Frustrated by his lack of success in finding God, glory, or gold, Coronado retreated to New Spain in 1542, humiliated, disillusioned, and defeated. Exhausted by excessive Spanish demands and frequent wars, the Pueblo Indians were glad to see the invaders go.

Individually and together, Richard Flint and Shirley Cushing Flint have written or edited six previous books on Coronado's failed expedition. Indeed, the editors have mined the Coronado expedition with far greater success than Coronado ever experienced in mining for wealth, souls, or social status on the northern frontier. In addition to their own extensive research and writing, the editors have encouraged fellow historians and anthropologists to develop their multidisciplinary interests in the Coronado expedition in two earlier anthologies, published in 1997 and 2003. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Latest Word from 1540: People, Places, and Portrayals of the Coronado Expedition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.