Can the Reef Survive? One of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World Is under Pressure from Development, Predators and Climatic Changes, While Australia Is under Pressure to Do Something about It

The Northern Star (Lismore, Australia), January 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

Can the Reef Survive? One of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World Is under Pressure from Development, Predators and Climatic Changes, While Australia Is under Pressure to Do Something about It


Byline: DANIEL BURDON

IT IS the largest coral reef system on the planet and one of Australiaas favourite holiday destinations.

It is the worldas largest single structure of living organisms and can be seen from space.

It generates millions of tourism dollars every year and supports thousands of Aussie jobs.

If you have ever been to the Great Barrier Reef, or dreamed of going there, you may already know that it is regarded as one of the seven natural wonders of the world.

But this World Heritage site is under serious threat.

Over the past 27 years, the combination of natural storms and cyclones, the crown of thorns starfish and coral bleaching have led to the loss of half of the reefas coral cover.

The 2009 report on the outlook for the reef also cited climate change, declining water quality from catchment run-off, loss of coastal habitats from coastal development and the impacts of shipping, fishing and illegal fishing as other threats.

In its sobering report in October, the Australian Institute of Marine Science also predicted that if current trends continued, the remaining half of the reefas coral would be gone within 10 years.

On top of the coral loss, numerous new port developments along the Queensland coast have compounded public concern for the reefas future.

The United Nations World Heritage Committee (WHC) has long known of many of the threats; expressing its aextreme concerna last year after the Federal Government approved three LNG projects on Curtis Island in the World Heritage area.

Construction of the three LNG plants on Curtis Island is underway, while a fourth proposed development on the island has stalled, but may still go ahead.

As part of the expansion, the Gladstone Ports Corporation is dredging 46 million cubic metres of sediment from the seabed to create access for gas tankers.

The dredging played a role in a national controversy, with renewed questions in recent weeks over a possible link between fish health problems and the project.

Further north, a three million cubic metre dredging project is proposed at Abbot Point near Bowen to allow for expansion at the port.

Those expansions were also on a list of projects which could affect the reef which the Federal Government provided to the committee last year.

Since that list was handed over, the Queensland Government has abandoned an additional expansion at Abbot Point, recently asking for expressions of interest for a much smaller expansion in the area.

The Federal Environment Department was also waiting on environmental impact statements for the Dudgeon Point coal port expansion at Hay Point near Mackay and the Fitzroy Terminal at Port Alma near Rockhampton.

After a monitoring mission to the reef last year, the WHC recommended no new developments be approved outside of existing port areas and that a huge strategic assessment of the reef be completed.

Good news for everyone who cares about the reef, and about Australiaas natural ecosystem, is that the strategic assessment is under way.

The Queensland Government and Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority are working together on the report, with the first draft expected in early March. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Can the Reef Survive? One of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World Is under Pressure from Development, Predators and Climatic Changes, While Australia Is under Pressure to Do Something about It
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.