Good-Looking Salaries; Melbourne University Research Shows Employers Base Most of Their Hiring Decisions on How Attractive Male Applicants Are

Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia), January 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

Good-Looking Salaries; Melbourne University Research Shows Employers Base Most of Their Hiring Decisions on How Attractive Male Applicants Are


THE AGE-OLD saying suggests looks arenat everything, but new research is suggesting they are a for men at least.

A recent study conducted by economist Jeff Borland from Melbourne University and former professor of economics at the Australian National University and current Federal Member for Fraser Andrew Leigh has found men with above-average looks earn over $30,000 more than those with below-average looks.

The research also found that men with below-average looks have a lesser chance of gaining employment and are typically receiving lower wages. These men were less likely to be married.

Mr Leigh said the inspiration behind the study grew from athe interesting dimension of how people differ in looksa.

He said the study revealed good-looking men bring larger financial bonuses to their individual companies or employers compared to plainer- looking men and suggested there is a hint of discrimination in the hiring process during job interviews.

aAbove-average-looking men are hired on more occasions than below-average-looking men. Some occupations employ good-looking men because they can bring profits to a business,a Mr Leigh said.

aSome of these occupations include car dealerships, modelling or television roles where the employee is going to be seen a lot by the public. Sometimes an employer will look specifically at the better-looking potential employees depending on the roles they will have to fill.

aIt seems from this study that beauty isnat in the eye of the beholder. …

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Good-Looking Salaries; Melbourne University Research Shows Employers Base Most of Their Hiring Decisions on How Attractive Male Applicants Are
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