News Gallery: A Selection of Images from This Week in News

Newsweek, January 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

News Gallery: A Selection of Images from This Week in News


jan. 2, 2013

Damara, Central African Republic

Guns and Poses

a convoy of troops from Chad rolled into a city 44 miles from the Central African Republic capital of Bangui in an effort to stop the steady advancement of the rebel Seleka Coalition. The insurgents began their offensive on Dec. 10, complaining that President Francois Bozize has not remained faithful to a 2007 peace deal providing amnesty for dissidents. Bozize himself seized office in a coup one decade ago, and his presidency has been only the most recent phase in a series of civic disturbances since the CAR gained independence from France in 1960. Government officials claim the rebels are really foreigners going after Bangui's rich natural resources. Both sides have agreed to peace talks in bordering Gabon, currently scheduled for Jan. 10, but Bozize has stated that he will refuse to cede power.

--Sarah Begley

Photograph by ben curtis--ap

Dec. 31, 2012

Washington, D.C.

Serving the Senate a Cup of Joe

"sure, all of us enjoy poking fun at our loquacious, irrepressible, unpredictable vice president ... And yet ... when the political game gets tense, time and time again it's Biden who gets called in." Thus wrote Michelle Cottle on The Daily Beast after "America's Happy Warrior" saved us from that dreaded cliff. The Washington Post lauded the veep for his ability to help hammer out a fiscal deal. When asked by reporters what had made the difference in the negotiations, Biden didn't hesitate. "Me," he replied.

--Louise Roug Bokkenheuser

Photograph by alex brandon--ap

jan. 2, 2013

Aleppo, Syria

Playing to Win

A Syrian insurgent finds rare levity amid the bleak ruins. The United Nations now estimates that the bloody, 21-month-long fight between antigovernment rebels and soldiers loyal to the authoritarian ruler, President Bashar al-Assad, has cost the lives of at least 60,000 people, a death toll described by the U.N. human rights commissioner as "truly shocking." Most of the casualties occurred in Homs and rural Damascus, and Idlib and the historic city of Aleppo in northwestern Syria have also been hit hard.

--Louise Roug Bokkenheuser

Photograph by andoni lubacki--ap

jan. 2, 2013

newtown, conn.

A Hard Return to Normal

When school resumed after Christmas, not all students in Newtown, Conn., went back to familiar surroundings. Those attending Sandy Hook Elementary began classes a day later, in a different school, in a neighboring town. Their own school building has been closed since Dec. 14 when a gunman shot and killed 20 children--all 6 or 7 years old--gunning them down in their classrooms. The shooter, identified by police as Adam Lanza, also murdered six female staffers at the school, some of whom had tried to shield the children with their bodies.

--Louise Roug Bokkenheuser

Photograph by jessica hill--ap

jan. 1, 2013

Scheveningen, The Netherlands

Shiver Me Timbers

no, they're not staging a Where's Waldo beach scene: 10,000 swimmers plunged into the frosty North Sea at noon on Tuesday for the traditional Nieuwjaarsduik, or New Year's Dive. …

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News Gallery: A Selection of Images from This Week in News
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