India's Shame

By D'Souza, Dilip | Newsweek, January 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

India's Shame


D'Souza, Dilip, Newsweek


Byline: Dilip d'Souza

A horrific rape is, sadly, unlikely to end the a[umlaut]everyday outrages against women.

there is no aspect of this sad, sordid episode that does not grate. Not even what happened after her death. She was gang-raped on a Delhi bus on Dec. 16, and died in Singapore nearly two weeks later. One report speaks of the police "rushing" the family "to get the cremation done before sunrise" and that they "asked the victim's neighbors to stay away from her house." Two thousand policemen were in place to add teeth to these requests. By themselves, these might, just might, have been seen as reasonable measures. But in a two-week spell during which nearly every government move has been graceless and ham-handed, this was just more of the same. The prime minister's reading of a prepared statement on the attack ended with a "Theek hai?" ("That OK?") to technicians, promptly and widely ridiculed as evidence of his glaring disconnect from popular sentiment. The police apparently saw fit to brutalize people, women included, protesting this ghastly crime--thereby only compounding the impression of their contempt for ordinary citizens. Some higher-up made the decision to fly the young woman to Singapore for treatment, setting off more angry speculation: Are our hospitals not good enough? Was this more political than medical? Should the criminals now be flown to Saudi Arabia for punishment? And the home minister probably took the wooden spoon for his stupid--no other word fits--equation of protesters to Maoists. And now her cremation was handled clumsily? Tell us something new, please.

but if the ham-handedness was bad, the details of what happened to the woman were monstrous. As a reminder of what can happen to women who simply want to go out on the town, they bear repeating in every gruesome detail. She and a male friend caught an evening film at a South Delhi mall. Wanting to head home afterward, they climbed into a bus that stopped for them. According to media reports, six men on the bus, including a minor, began taunting and then assaulting them with an iron rod. They beat the male friend into submission, then took the woman to the back of the bus. …

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