Wish You Were Here

By Cottle, Michelle | Newsweek, January 11, 2013 | Go to article overview

Wish You Were Here


Cottle, Michelle, Newsweek


Byline: michelle cottle

On Nixon's 100th, a[umlaut]Republican faithful party like it's 1972.

this is what nostalgia looks like: It's Jan. 9, and the Grand Ballroom of Washington's storied Mayflower hotel has been decked out for the Richard Nixon Foundation's centennial-birthday gala celebrating the late president, who would have turned 100 today. Reproductions of campaign posters and buttons trumpet slogans like "Had Enough? A vote for Nixon is a vote for change." And "Nixon's the one." Towering screens in the corners of the hall show Nixon photos and quotes through the decades. Some 400 of the president's kin, ex-staff, and enduring fans have powdered, coiffed, and stuffed themselves into their finest party duds, rendering the dining room a sea of dark suits, balding pates, sequins, and fiercely teased hair. Servers wheel out a massive birthday cake in the shape of Nixon's boyhood home in Yorba Linda, Calif.

this is what nostalgia sounds like: Hundreds of attendees sing along to grainy video footage of Nixon playing "Happy Birthday" on the piano. The Rev. Franklin Graham reads a wish-I-could-be-there letter from his ailing father, Billy, who lauds Nixon as "one of my warmest lifelong friends." Legendary Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, his trademark growl grown even more halting with age, extols his former boss's foreign-policy vision. Nixon aide turned pundit and presidential candidate Pat Buchanan takes the room on a historical stroll through the tumultuous 1960s. When guests mingle, the air is filled with "Do you remember ..." and "I haven't seen you since ..." This is definitely your (grand)father's Republican party.

any event dedicated to the unadulterated praise of America's 37th president carries with it a certain cognitive dissonance. Whatever his achievements, Richard Nixon remains, for many Americans, the embodiment of political ambition gone wrong. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wish You Were Here
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.