Exposing Uncle Sam's Internet Snooping; Judge Finds Freedom of Information Essential to Privacy Protection

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 15, 2013 | Go to article overview

Exposing Uncle Sam's Internet Snooping; Judge Finds Freedom of Information Essential to Privacy Protection


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Uncle Sam is looking for ways to sharpen his watchful gaze. In the name of fighting terrorism, federal agencies can have a hard time distinguishing the line between legitimate surveillance and unlawful spying. Fortunately, a court ruling on the public's right to know may brighten that line. Loss of hard-won liberty ought not be the price for keeping Americans safe.

On Jan. 8, Judge Gladys Kessler of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia denied the Obama administration's request to exempt documents related to the government's Internet surveillance from Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) compliance. The judge also chastised administration officials for delays in producing records approved for release. In effect, she said freedom of information means just that.

The case involved a pilot program operated jointly by the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security started in 2011 to monitor electronic traffic passing through certain Internet-service providers in an effort to catch hackers launching computerized attacks against defense contractors' networks. The Pentagon's intelligence branch, the National Security Agency (NSA), partnered with AT&T, Verizon and CenturyLink to snoop on the Internet traffic of 15 defense firms that agreed to participate, including Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, CSC and SAIC. Rather than scrutinize all their traffic, the NSA says it used filters that only looked for certain malicious code that would be a sign of hacker penetration.

Privacy advocates feared that having the feds tap into the public Internet flow could lead to government spying on the electronic communications of private citizens. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Exposing Uncle Sam's Internet Snooping; Judge Finds Freedom of Information Essential to Privacy Protection
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.