Food, Soda Makers Must Change Ways

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Food, Soda Makers Must Change Ways


Food, soda makers must change ways

Recently on CNN/Finance, the CEO of Coca-Cola began coming to grips with the inevitable complicity of the soda industry and American obesity. Still he danced around the edge of the canyon because his job is to protect the shareholders.

The scientific facts are that the human body cannot metabolize processed sugar, and, especially while under stress, it demands sugar. When given these substitutes for digestible sugars, its demand becomes louder and louder. We give it larger and larger portions and multiple servings, but it then craves carbohydrates, which our bodies break down into digestible sugar. Look at the snack bags that litter our cars. We call them "carbs."

Like McDonald's, the soda industry profited heavily from the urbanization of the human species and is going to have to surrender its core market because of the consequences. Hamburgers (fat) and sodas (sugar) are very slowly killing us. Proces sed sugars have now been found to be what causes inflammation in our arteries and allows plaque to stick to the artery walls. Wasn't the ignorance of the '60s blissful?

For a scientific study of our endocrine system and the sugar "hamster wheel," read Ed Hall's "The Hidden Dimension," a short 300 page study. It could change your life -- and possibly save it.

Frank Kowynia

Schaumburg

It's all just play money to Congress

So what is all the fuss about this debt ceiling, fiscal cliff and economic doomsday? As inept as this administration and Congress are in solving economic problems, there is an easy solution staring them right in their face. Raise the debt limit to $25 trillion -- no, make it $30 trillion. We will then have all the money this generation will ever need.

And then when soon-to-be Treasurer Jack Lew comes on board and signs all our Monopoly money with his comical loop-de-loop signature, the dollar will be the envy of the world. …

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