Cary President Hopefuls Disagree on Ex-Manager's Departure

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), January 24, 2013 | Go to article overview

Cary President Hopefuls Disagree on Ex-Manager's Departure


Byline: Lenore T. Adkins ladkins@dailyherald.com

Cary's handling of its long-departed village administrator was still fresh in the minds of the two men vying to become village president during their recent Daily Herald endorsement interview.

Mark Kownick, who served on the board from 2009 to 2011 and then lost his seat, owns a facility services company. He's running because he likes to be part of the process and in the know of what's going on in the community.

Bruce Kaplan, a trustee in his first term, says he looks for wrongs and tries to right them. When he ran for the board two years ago, he was upset about having to pay higher fees to post his real estate signs in town -- fees Kownick later had a role in reducing or waiving.

"I felt like I was shining a bright light in a dark room and watching the cockroaches scatter," Kaplan said of the feeling he had when he started asking questions of the village. He ran as part of a four-person slate that demanded transparency and was elected.

One of the village's biggest wrongs, Kaplan said, was the severance package the previous board gave to Cameron Davis, who was village administrator for 16 years.

Davis was terminated in 2011 and received six months pay -- including a 1.7-percent cost-of-living increase -- and a lump sum of $47,500 for accrued vacation, personal, sick and comp time. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cary President Hopefuls Disagree on Ex-Manager's Departure
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.