'Build Bridges in the Community Lest We Forget the Terrible Events' SERVICE TO REMEMBER VICTIMS OF HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), January 28, 2013 | Go to article overview

'Build Bridges in the Community Lest We Forget the Terrible Events' SERVICE TO REMEMBER VICTIMS OF HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE


Byline: LIZ DAY liz.keen@walesonline.co.uk

CARWYN JONES will today lead tributes to millions of Jews and others killed during the Second World War as Wales marks Holocaust Memorial Day.

The First Minister will today join a national service of remembrance in Cardiff, on the 68th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

The First Minister said: "The very word Holocaust brings to mind images from the darkest recesses of human history, where hate and intolerance led to the death of millions of fellow humans."

He added: "Holocaust Memorial Day is an opportunity for all of us to take the time to remember those who died and those who survived the atrocities of genocide.

"These terrible events are not something from hundreds of years ago, but are a part of our recent history and to remember them contributes to our determination as a society for such horrors never to happen again."

More than one million people, mostly Jews, died at Auschwitz before it was liberated by the allied forces in 1945. Many of those who died were killed in gas chambers.

National Holocaust Memorial Day was started by the UK Government in 2001 and takes place on January 27 every year.

Organisers say the day of remembrance is also intended to honour victims of genocide around the globe, including those in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.

Wales' national commemoration has been organised by Cardiff Council and the Welsh Government and will be held at 1pm in City Hall.

The First Minister is expected to give a reading and lay a wreath alongside the leader of Cardiff Council Heather Joyce, South Wales Jewish Representative Council member Norma Golten and secretary general of the Muslim Council of Wales Saleem Kidwai.

The theme of this year's day of remembrance is "Communities Together: Build a Bridge". Ms Joyce said: "It's important that Holocaust Memorial Day is marked in the city to ensure these terrible events in history and which, unfortunately, still happen today are never forgotten."

She added: "Remembering the mistakes of the past helps us to ensure they never happen again. The communities together theme highlights how important it is for people to respect those in their community."

Olivia Marks-Woldman, chief executive of the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust, said: "Whole communities were completely destroyed during the Holocaust and subsequent genocides, which is why we are asking people to honour Holocaust Memorial Day 2013 by building bridges within their communities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Build Bridges in the Community Lest We Forget the Terrible Events' SERVICE TO REMEMBER VICTIMS OF HOLOCAUST AND GENOCIDE
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.