Scorsese's Film Heroes

Newsweek, November 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

Scorsese's Film Heroes


The legendary director picks his favorite cinematic moments of guts and glory.

THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES

This is a picture about the heroism of coming home from the war, facing your loved ones and your job and a world that knows nothing of what you've endured. It was directed by William Wyler, who himself had served. The homecomings; Dana Andrews's flier being soothed after a nightmare by Teresa Wright; Harold Russell (a real vet with prosthetic hands) calling on his father to help him into bed--these are among the most moving passages in American cinema.

BICYCLE THIEVES

At the end of this Italian neorealist classic by Vittorio De Sica, a young boy (Enzo Staiola) sees his father (Lamberto Maggiorani) scorned, humiliated, almost sent to jail, and then takes his hand and walks proudly by his side. In

one beautiful moment, the son realizes that their roles must reverse and that, at least for the moment, he needs to look out for his father.

LA PROMESSE

From the Dardenne brothers in Belgium, another story of a young boy (Jeremie Renier) who must grow up quickly. His loyalties are divided between his father (Olivier Gourmet) and the wife (Assita Ouedraogo) of a man who has been killed at their makeshift "hotel" for illegal immigrants. This is the story of a boy's moral awakening, a spiritual suspense film in which a young soul denies what he's familiar with and stands up for humanity--the dead man's and his own.

SAVING PRIVATE RYAN AND THE THIN R E D L I N E

Two very different pictures about the heroism of battle that came out in the same year, the first from Steven Spielberg and the second from Terrence Malick. Both films look at the question of heroism in war from a variety of angles (like the moment in the Malick picture where Elias Koteas's captain bravely refuses an order from his commanding officer, played by Nick Nolte), and both feature harrowing assaults on an enemy stronghold in which each soldier knows that he must keep moving forward and that he could be blown to bits at any moment. Two great modern war epics.

THE SEARCHERS

Near the end of John Ford's now-canonical Western epic of time and space, John Wayne picks up Natalie Wood, his niece, for whom he's spent the last 10 years searching. Along the way, she has lived her life among the Indians and become an object of hatred in his eyes. He lifts her by the arms, looks into her eyes, his hatred drains away, and he cradles her in his arms like the child she was when he last saw her. It's one of the most stunning reversals in cinema. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Scorsese's Film Heroes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.