Astral Peeks

Daily Examiner (Grafton, Australia), February 6, 2013 | Go to article overview

Astral Peeks


A little astrology history

THE origin of astrology is thought to begin with the ancient Babylonians two centuries before the birth of Christ.

The first areas of the world that astrology spread to were China, India and Greece. Each culture infused the basic Babylonian astrological belief structure with their own myths, legends and interpretations.

Astrologers were some of the first scientists in medieval Europe. It was astrologers that made the first accurate maps of star movement as well as the orbit of the moon and many astronomical observations about the Earth itself.

Not only were some of the first scientists astrologers, some of the most respected scientific minds in human history were practising astrologers. Historic names such as Kepler, Jung, Galileo, Copernicus and Brahe were all significant contributors to astrology during their time as scientists. Even with the marginalisation of astrology that was ongoing even in the time that these famous figures were alive, they managed to practise and further the belief in astrology, along with their better known scientific practices.

Education and astrology have had an intertwined past. In Europe, during the medieval period, a university quality education was divided up into seven separate categories, one for each known planet. These disciplines became known as the liberal arts; a term still used today on many college campuses. These arts evolved into the modern sciences, but their roots are firmly planted in the field of astrology. …

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