From Hyde Park to Harlem: The Emergence of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Black Constituency in New York City

By Taylor, Durahn | Afro-Americans in New York Life and History, January 2013 | Go to article overview

From Hyde Park to Harlem: The Emergence of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Black Constituency in New York City


Taylor, Durahn, Afro-Americans in New York Life and History


FIGURE 1: AFRICAN-AMERICAN VOTE PERCENTAGES FOR PRESIDENT, GOVERNOR AND MAYOR WITHIN SELECTED HARLEM ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS, 1928-1945

The following tables present the average vote percentage won by each major party in Harlem's Presidential, Gubernatorial, and Mayoral contests between 1928 and 1945.

The tables are based upon an analysis of selected election districts within Manhattan that I determined to have been at least 90% African-American at the time in which the election took place, following the procedure which Nancy Weiss had used for Presidential elections between 1932 and 194-0, and for the off-year elections of 1934 and 1938. For the remaining years and contests, I correlated census tract maps of Harlem, (isolating those which the census determined to be more than 90% black), with the election district maps of Harlem located in the New York Public Library. This procedure helps isolate the variable of race in the districts analyzed.

Sources: "Official Canvass of the Votes Cast," City Record, 1928-1945. Nancy Weiss, Farewell to the Party of Lincoln: Black Politics in the Age of FDR (Princeton: 1983), 308.

1928 Presidential

A.D.  Democratic  Republican (Hoover)
        (Smith )

13          29.8                 64.4
19          27.1                 66.5
21          27.4                 65.7
22          25.8                 67.3

1928 Gubernatorial

A.D.  Democratic   Republican
      (Roosevelt)  (Ottinger)

13           29.1        61.5
19           27.1        61.9
21           28.4        61.9
22           26.9        64.4

1929 Nayoral

A.D.  Democratic  Republican (La
        (Walker)        Guardia)

13          40.1            52.1
19          35.8            56.9
21          39.6            53.5
22          35.2            58.1

1930 Gubernatorial

A.D.  Democratic(  Republican (Tuttle)
       Roosevelt)

13           50.7                 45.3
19           48.0                 47.7
21           49.4                 46.8
22           42.6                 53.8

1932 Presidential

A.D.  Democratic   Republican (Hoover)
      (Roosevelt)

13           47.1                 43.8
19           51.0                 41.0
21           46.1                 44.7
22           44.4                 47.0

1932 Gubernatorial

A.D.  Democratic (Lehman)  Republican (Donovan)

13                  49.7                   38.2
19                  53.2                   36.8
21                  50.4                   38.2
22                  51.8                   38.7

1932 Special Mayoral

A.D.  Democratic  Republican  Write-In (McKee)
       (O'Brien)    (Pounds)

13          45.5        35.0               1.3
19          50.8        34.5               9.5
21          46.5        35.3               2.4
22          45.2        36.0               4.3

1933 Mayoral

A.D.  Democratic  Republican (La    Fusion   Recovery
       (O'Brien)        Guardia)       (La    (McKee)
                                  Guardia)

13          28.4            27.2      11.2       23.1
19          33.6            27.6       8.1       17.7
21          27.9            27.8       9.4       25.4
22          32.6            24.1      12.4       21.1

1934 Gubernatorial

A.D.  Democratic (Lehman)  Republican (Moses)

13                  50.9                 39.7
19                  57.2                 31.8
21                  61.0                 29.3
22                  65.5                 28.2

1936 Presidential

A.D.  Democratic  Republican  American Labor
     (Roosevelt)    (Landon)     (Roosevelt)

13          72.5        21.7             2.0
19          76.1        17.0             2.1
21          78.5        15.1             2.9
22          77.3        17.1             3.0

1936 Gubernatorial

A.D.  Democratic (Lehman)  Republican (Bleakley)

13           71.1                    21.4
19           74.1                    16.8
21           77.2                    15.3
22           75.5                    17.8

1937 Mayoral

A. … 

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