March Is Women's History Month

Curriculum Review, February 2013 | Go to article overview

March Is Women's History Month


Origins & Background

Influential and famous women in American history were first nationally recognized with the 1981 celebration of Women's History Week. Through 1987, Congress would pass resolutions to designate one week in March to honor women in history until responding to a petition by the National Women's History Project in favor of one full month to recognize notable women. From 1988 to 1994, presidents were requested to proclaim each March Women's History Month; since 1995, each president has dutifully designated March as a month to recognize, honor and give respect to the great influence of women throughout American history.

For the Classroom

This March, tap into resources from The Library of Congress at www.WomensHistoryMonth.gov to enrich lesson plans and classroom activities in honor of this important theme month. Visit www.WomensHistoryMonth.gov/teacher.html to access ...

* The Library of Congress. View exhibitions, presentations, lessons and other classroom materials. Topics include the timeline of the Women's Suffrage Movement, women in literature, First Ladies of the United States, American women in the military, women pioneers, Rosie the Riveter, women activists and more.

* Women's Words of Wisdom. View an image gallery featuring such notable women as Harriet Tubman, Susan B. Anthony, Annie Oakley, Amelia Earhart, Abigail Adams and more. Behind each photograph is biographical information and quotable "words of wisdom" from the women.

* Resources from The National Archives. These sources come complete with materials to enhance classroom learning and offer a focused look on some of the most revered women and women's movement in history. Topics include women's suffrage, Margaret Sanger's fight for women's health measures, Rosie the Riveter, women in the labor force, the arrest and legacy of Rosa Parks and more.

* Resources from The National Endowment for the Humanities. From biographical information to lesson activities to variations, discussion questions, materials and more, this section covers such topics as notable First Ladies like Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt, strides toward social reform in the 1930s, international women in literature and more. …

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