Complete Crime & Punishment Series

By Frazier, Nancy | Reference & User Services Quarterly, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

Complete Crime & Punishment Series


Frazier, Nancy, Reference & User Services Quarterly


Complete Crime & Punishment Series. Edited by William J. Chambliss. Key Issues in Crime and Punishment Series. Los Angeles: Sage Reference, 2011. 5 vols. $400 (ISBN: 978-1-4129-9903-8). E-books available, $500.

This collection explores current, significant issues in the field of criminal justice. The five volumes edited by William J. Chambliss comprise the Key Issues in Crime and Punishment series--Crime and Criminal Behavior; Police and Law Enforcement; Courts, Law, and Justice; Corrections; and Juvenile Crime and Justice.

In addition to being available as a five-volume set, each volume is available for separate purchase. Each title features its own focused introduction by Chambliss and a separate index to its content. With the changing scope and need for print reference materials, this offers libraries the advantage of purchasing all or selected series titles, depending on their students' or patrons' research needs.

The volumes are highly readable, well-organized, and filled with interesting content. Each chapter includes background information on a topic, as well as brief pro--con essays about the topic. Bibliographic references for further reading are included, as well as "see also" references to pages within the volume. Some examples of topics covered include undocumented immigrants, guns, and terrorism within Crime and Criminal Behavior; vigilantes, Miranda warnings, and zero-tolerance policing within Police and Law Enforcement; insanity laws, DNA evidence, and victims' rights within Courts, Law, and Justice; gangs and prison violence, capital punishment, and prison privatization within Corrections; and school violence, violent juvenile offenders, and age of responsibility within Juvenile Crime and Justice. …

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