Collaborative Faculty Assessment of Service-Learning Student Work to Improve Student and Faculty Learning and Course Design

By Shapiro, Daniel F. | Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Collaborative Faculty Assessment of Service-Learning Student Work to Improve Student and Faculty Learning and Course Design


Shapiro, Daniel F., Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning


This paper illustrates an approach for using university-wide service-learning student outcomes to assess student work for the purpose of improving service-learning student and faculty learning and course design. The author and a colleague used this approach to study the author's service-learning course. The results of this study generated an accessible and engaging assessment framework that integrates basic quantitative analysis of collective student performance, Polin and Keene's (2010) ethnographic sensibility, and Cooks, Scharrer and Paredes' (2004) social approach to learning from a faculty learning perspective.

**********

Service-learning in higher education is becoming more common, with the Association of American Colleges and Universities now promoting service-learning as 1 of 10 High Impact Practices (HIPs) that engage students in meaningful college learning (Kuh, 2008). Reflecting this trend, service-learning theory and research is moving beyond questioning whether service-learning should be a standard component of higher education curricula (e.g., Eyler & Giles, 1999) to determining best practices (e.g., Holt, 2010; O'Meara & Niehaus, 2009). One area of best practices needing attention is outcomes-based faculty assessment of student learning. Although assessment approaches have been developed (Maki, 2010), engaging faculty in such work is a significant challenge (Driscoll & Wood, 2007; Wood, 2006).

This paper presents and illustrates an outcomes-based assessment approach and framework that can engage faculty in collaborative assessment and improvement of service-learning courses and student learning. The first part of this paper describes the approach, the second part presents a collaborative study of the author's service-learning course using this approach, and the third part describes the assessment framework that emerged from the study.

University-Wide Service Learning Outcomes

California State University, Monterey Bay, where this study was conducted, is a relatively new, four-year public university first admitting students in 1995. The University has a guiding vision statement (California State University Monterey Bay, 1994) emphasizing social responsibility, social justice, and a commitment to serve the local community. Students are required to take two service-learning courses: a lower-division introductory course and an upper-division course in the major. Each course requires 30 hours of service with a local community partner. The lower-division course introduces students to the University's service-learning philosophy and approach (California State University Monterey Bay, 2010). The upper-division course has students apply skills and knowledge introduced at the lower division in a context relevant to their major. To support service-learning, the University has a Service Learning Institute that provides administrative support to students, faculty and community partners; helps build course-community partnerships; develops and disseminates University-wide student learning outcomes; oversees all service-learning courses; and provides faculty development opportunities.

Because the University was mandated to be outcomes-based at its inception, all general education requirements, including service-learning, have university-wide student learning outcomes developed by faculty learning communities (Driscoll & Cordero de Noriega, 2006; Driscoll & Wood, 2007). Service-learning is considered more than just a pedagogical approach, but also "a knowledge-base that examines the complex intersection of justice, compassion, diversity and social responsibility with the technical, conceptual and theoretical world of the academic disciplines" (Cordero de Noriega & Pollack, 2006). Not only is educating about and preparing for civic engagement (Colby, Beaumont, Ehrlich, & Corngold, 2007; Colby, Ehrlich, Beaumont, & Stephens, 2003) a key component of the University's service-learning vision, but in addition the University also emphasizes a social justice framework that aligns with Mitchell's (2008) "critical approach" to service-learning that is "unapologetic in its aim to dismantle systems of injustice" (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Collaborative Faculty Assessment of Service-Learning Student Work to Improve Student and Faculty Learning and Course Design
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.