Chicago's Deadly Gun Control Lessons; Children Die despite Draconian Laws

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 11, 2013 | Go to article overview

Chicago's Deadly Gun Control Lessons; Children Die despite Draconian Laws


Byline: Paul Miller , SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The King College Prep student was one of 42 homicide victims in Chicago during the month of January. Pendleton's story is an all-too-common tale in the Windy City. You wouldn't know it, though, due to the media and political efforts to control the conversation - using this deadly epidemic for the national cause of gun control instead of actually making life safer back in Chicago.

Last year, more than 500 individuals were murdered in Chicago. The public perception is that the violence is always gang related - criminal killing criminal. Gun control advocates use this point of view to combat critics who claim that Chicago, which has the toughest gun laws in the country, is an example that gun control doesn't work. What Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel don't want to discuss is that gang related or not, innocent children are being buried in their own backyard.

Fifty-six children - under the age of 18 - met violent ends last year in Chicago, while 133 individuals - nearly one-third of all the murdered victims - never saw their 21st birthdays. Still, the city and the state don't want to talk about the nightmare that Chicago's African-American and Hispanic neighborhoods have become. Nobody is asking how the disastrous economy of Illinois is contributing to violence on the streets of Chicago.

Illinois has an unfunded pension deficit of $200 billion. It now lays claim to the worst credit rating in the nation. Single-party rule - controlled by public-employee unions - has created a business climate that is benefiting neighboring states. The black unemployment rate average in 2012, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, was 24.2 percent. That is not a typo - the unemployment rate in Chicago's black community is almost 1 in 4. The overwhelming majority of the murders take place in minority neighborhoods, which implies this is not a gun control issue - it's the economy, stupid.

In Illinois, nobody is talking about the kick the can down the road mentality that is killing our children - literally. Elected officials for over a decade have seen their policies fail time after time. …

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