In Memorium

Accounting Historians Journal, December 2012 | Go to article overview

In Memorium


I am sorry to report the death of a colleague and friend: Louis J. Stewart on September 19, 2012. I met him several times at conferences and he was a delight--full of good spirits and conversation. We were in contact shortly before his death and he gave no indication that he was ill. I was expecting him at the historians' workshop at the AAA in Washington DC having spoken to him shortly before that and was disappointed that he did not show. I extend all of our sympathies to his family.

Louis J. Stewart was born in Charleston, South Carolina and raised in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He attended Central High School where he starred in track and cross-country. He matriculated at Franklin and Marshall College in September 1969. He continued to compete in cross country while majoring in history. Louis was also active in the African American Student Society. He earned his bachelor of art degree from the College in 1973. Louis continued his education at the University of Chicago where he earned his MBAS with a dual concentration in accounting and finance. Since his graduation from the University of Chicago in June 1975 Louis worked as a financial analyst at the United Way of Chicago, as the controller of Chicago Child Care Society, and the chief financial officer of the Englewood Community Health Organization over the next seventeen years. …

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