A Donkey Stalks Westminster

By Maguire, Kevin | New Statesman (1996), February 1, 2013 | Go to article overview

A Donkey Stalks Westminster


Maguire, Kevin, New Statesman (1996)


Declarations of loyalty to David Cameron from Adam Afriyie were undermined by an admission he had discussed the "long-term future of the party" with other Tories. The hapless Windsor MP may be more stalking donkey than stalking horse but his wealth, reportedly as large as [pounds sterling]100m, buys him clout. He might never wear the crown, but one so rich could finance a coronation. Which office did my snout see Afriyie popping in and out of in the weeks before the great plot was publicly alleged? None other than the Commons den--an office along a corridor called the North Curtain, a short cut from the hairdressers--of Dr Liam Fox. Afriyie may not harbour leadership ambitions but I'm not sure the same could be said of the right-wing former defence secretary.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The "Nazi stag party"

MP Aidan Burley continues to confound colleagues on the Commons work and pensions committee with his poor grasp of government programmes. Hurly-Burley interrupted a discussion of Disability Living Allowance with a question about Employment and Support Allowance. My informant said it was rather like raising India during deliberations on South America. The more I hear about Burley, the easier it is to grasp how he failed to understand that an SS uniform would cause offence. I suspect he isn't overwhelmed with bids when pub quiz teams are formed.

Interesting to note how peers'attendance in the House of Cronies is going up with their expenses. …

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