Florida Has Set Gun Laws in Stone; the State, Not Localities, Will Decide on Regulations

By Patterson, Steve | The Florida Times Union, January 20, 2013 | Go to article overview

Florida Has Set Gun Laws in Stone; the State, Not Localities, Will Decide on Regulations


Patterson, Steve, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Steve Patterson

Gun-control plans President Barack Obama outlined Wednesday follow White House calls for a national dialogue on guns.

But for cities across Florida, that dialogue starts and ends in Tallahassee.

"I can't remember the last time I got a call, or if I've ever gotten a call, about gun control," said Jacksonville City Councilman John Crescimbeni. "... It's not my jurisdiction."

State law could make sure that won't change.

Since 1987, Florida's Legislature has barred local governments from setting any rules about owning, carrying or shooting guns, saying it was the state's job - alone - to make those choices.

"Miami may want a different policy than Jacksonville. But there's not much they can do about it," said Matt Corrigan, a political scientist at the University of North Florida.

Florida has less gun regulation than many states, and is rated "least restrictive" in a state-by-state ranking by the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a gun-control advocacy group.

A chain of Republican governors and GOP-controlled Legislatures helped enact limits on gun rules, which at one point made the state one of the most gun-friendly in America, said Corrigan, who has been researching Gov. Jeb Bush's legacy. From limiting environmental liability for lead around gun ranges to barring doctors from talking to patients about guns in homes, lawmakers backed a range of measures that muted issues of concern to some gun critics.

The National Rifle Association also saw the benefits of having a strong voice in Tallahassee.

"If you get what you want passed at the state level, then you're not worried about variation at the local level," Corrigan said.

State-level control, known as pre-emption, has eliminated the possibility of local regulation in all but three states, making influence over legislatures more critical for groups like the NRA, said Gary Kleck, a Florida State University criminology professor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Florida Has Set Gun Laws in Stone; the State, Not Localities, Will Decide on Regulations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.